February 09, 2016

THE AUTOMATIC HATE — POSTER

Automatic Hate

February 05, 2016

SMART NEW MEDIA PRESENTS PAUL VERHOEVEN: REBEL

Paul Verhoeven boiled the brain of many an audience member when Sharon Stone flashed a beaver shot at her middle-aged male interrogators in the most dungeon-styled police station you've ever seen. Sex has always been a prime motivator to Verhoeven's work. High art mixed with basic instincts.

BASIC INSTINCT

February 04, 2016

SCARE PEWDIEPIE — TRAILER

If you ever doubted that YouTube sucks harder than $5 hooker on the first of the month, just check out this unmitigated horse shit. 

George Miller to preside the Jury of the 69th Festival de Cannes

George Miller © Carl Court / AFP

The 69th Festival de Cannes will be presided by the Australian director, screenwriter and producer, George Miller. Along with his Jury, it will fall to him to award the Palme d’or at the close of the Festival, to be held from 11 to 22 May.

On receiving his invitation from the Festival, George Miller exclaimed, "What an unmitigated delight! To be there in the middle of this storied festival at the unveiling of cinematic treasures from all over the planet. To spend time in passionate discourse with fellow members of the jury. Such an honor. I'll be there with bells on!"

It was in Cannes last May that Mad Max: Fury Road set out on its fantastic cavalcade across our screens. The film, shown Out of Competition in the Official Selection, marked the return not only of the hero of the legendary saga for the millions of fans of Max Rockatansky, but also the comeback of his creator, George Miller, and of the visionary filmmaking that made him a household name around the world.

The roots of George Miller's career, alongside those of Peter Weir, Bruce Beresford and Phillip Noyce stretch back to the golden age of Australian cinema from the 1980s. Originally from a small village in Queensland, George Miller wrote and directed Violence in the Cinema, part 1 in 1971. Produced by his friend Byron Kennedy, with whom he founded the Kennedy Miller company, the short film picked up two prizes from the Australian Film Institute. This official recognition encouraged George Miller to pursue a career in film and to make his first feature.  

In 1979, Mad Max, inspired by the "outback gothic" genre sweeping Australia at the time, introduced Mel Gibsonand was a worldwide smash hit. A superb pas-de-deux with American cinema, this ultra-violent futuristic film brought the action film genre a touch of class with its masterly combination of Road Movie, Western and Science-Fiction elements. A legendary saga was born which in turn gave rise to Mad Max 2: the Road Warrior in 1981, Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome in 1985 and Mad Max: Fury Road in 2015.

Throughout his career, George Miller has constantly experimented with a variety of genres, brilliantly reconciling mass audience expectations and the highest artistic standards. In 1983, along with John Landis, Steven Spielberg and Joe Dante, he directed the final segment of Twilight Zone: The Movie. Then came The Witches of 'Eastwick in 1987 and the intimate drama Lorenzo's Oil in 1992, starring Susan Sarandon and Nick Nolte, which picked up Oscar nominations for Best Screenplay and Best Actress. 

In 1995, he adapted and produced Babe, directed by Chris Noonan, which picked up seven Oscar nominations including Best Film and Best Adaptation. In 2006, his first animated film Happy Feet was a huge box office hit and garnered the Oscar for Best Animated Feature. Happy Feet 2 took up the story in 2011.

In 2015, 30 years after the last Mad Max, the 4th chapter of the post-apocalyptic epic, complete with feminist and anti-totalitarian overtones, once again took cinemas by storm and has been the talk of the press and the festival circuit ever since. With ten nominations for the 2016 Oscars, including Best Film and Best Director, it recently scooped no fewer than nine prizes at the Critics Choice Awards, including that of Best Director. 

The 70-year-old Miller has won international acclaim for these spectacular and jubilant creations, as well as for his eclecticism, inventiveness and sheer audacity.  His nomination marks a no-holds-barred celebration of genre cinema. But above all, the 2016 Festival de Cannes is all set to welcome a big-hearted film lover and a great human being.

February 02, 2016

RENDEZ-VOUS WITH FRENCH CINEMA 2016

NEW YORK, NY (FEBRUARY 2, 2016) – The Film Society of Lincoln Center and UniFrance announce the 21st edition of Rendez-Vous with French Cinema, the celebrated annual showcase of the best in contemporary French film, March 3-13 at the Film Society of Lincoln Center. Special thanks to our Premiere sponsors Lacoste & Renault.

Please join us for advance press screenings at the Walter Reade Theater, 165 West 65th Street, between Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

 
FILMS, DESCRIPTIONS & PUBLIC SCREENING SCHEDULE


Opening Night
Valley of Love
Guillaume Nicloux, France/Belgium, 2015, DCP, 92m
English and French with English subtitles
Guillaume Nicloux’s sui generis, elegiac road movie puts a meta twist on a familiar setup: titans Gérard Depardieu and Isabelle Huppert star as famous French actors Gérard and Isabelle, a long-divorced couple whose son Michael has committed suicide six months prior to their Californian rendezvous in Death Valley, occasioned by an enigmatic letter from Michael that seems to have been written some time after his death. The letter asks them to visit a series of sites in the area; at the end of this tour, Michael claims he will appear before them. What follows is an utterly singular trip of a film, by turns melancholic and funny, self-reflexive and surreal. In their first film together since Maurice Pialat’s Loulou in 1980, Depardieu and Huppert astound with their enthralling portrayal of grieving parents who, to an ambiguous degree, appear to be versions of themselves, making for a tour de force as moving as it is complex. A Strand Releasing release.
Thursday, March 3, 6:00pm (Intro only by Isabelle Huppert and Guillaume Nicloux)

Closing Night
Dheepan
Jacques Audiard, France, 2015, DCP, 109m
French with English subtitles
Jacques Audiard (A Prophet, Rust and Bone) won the Palme d’Or at Cannes for this daring, genre-bending portrait of three Sri Lankan refugees—Dheepan (Antonythasan Jesuthasan), Yalini (Kalieaswari Srinivasan), and Illayaal (Claudine Vinasithamby)—who form a fake family unit to emigrate. When they find themselves living together in a violent, gang-dominated housing project outside Paris, they start to reevaluate the terms of their intimacy. Like his character, the actor and novelist Jesuthasan was a member of the militant nationalist army LTTE (Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam) before fleeing the country and settling into a series of odd jobs in Paris, while eventually renouncing all ties to the Tigers. When, in its bloody last act, his character has to fall back on his military training, Dheepan becomes something darker: a harrowing reckoning with the past. A Sundance Selects release.
Sunday, March 13, 6:00pm and 8:30pm

21 Nights with Pattie / 21 nuits avec Pattie
Jean-Marie & Arnaud Larrieu, France, 2015, DCP, 115m
French with English subtitles
The Larrieu brothers make oddball, tonally mixed comedies unlike anything else in French cinema today. In their latest, a slightly prim woman Caroline (Isabelle Carré) arrives in a small village in the Pyrénées to bury her estranged mother. There, she befriends Pattie (Karin Viard), who offers tales of her sexual adventures with the local men, including a priapic half-man, half-beast creature (Denis Lavant). Caroline’s ongoing debate between pride and pleasure is just one link in a chain of increasingly wild events: the mysterious disappearance of her mother’s body, the ensuing surreal police investigation, and some shocking revelations about her mother’s former lover, who may or not be the writer J.M.G. Le Clézio—played to perfection by André Dussollier. U.S. Premiere
Friday, March 11, 1:30pm
Saturday, March 12, 6:45pm

The Apaches / Des Apaches
Nassim Amaouche, France, 2015, DCP, 97m
French with English subtitles
Les Inrocks accounted for the six years it took Nassim Amaouche to release his second feature by calling him “a director with a temperament as patient, roving and reflective as his films.” He stars as Samir, a young French-Algerian man lured by a dubious “family” lawyer (André Dussollier) into making an occult business deal within a similarly marginalized setting: one of Paris’s largest and most diverse Kabyle communities. Having been drawn into the family bar business by his estranged father, Samir still agonizes over the memory of his late mother, while falling in love with a beautiful and mysterious single mom (Laetitia Casta). The Apaches is a delicate movie that doubles as a tense negotiation drama and a quiet, reflective memory play. U.S. Premiere
Friday, March 4, 4:00pm
Sunday, March 13, 1:30pm

Bang Gang (A Modern Love Story)
Eva Husson, France, 2016, DCP, 98m
French with English subtitles
Eva Husson’s debut feature, shot and set in the wealthy coastal suburbs of Biarritz, is an unapologetically blissed-out, frankly explicit anthology of the sexual experiments a cluster of teenagers undertake over the course of one summer. Determined to keep the attentions of her favorite boy Alex (Finnegan Oldfield), George (Marilyn Lima) encourages her group of horny friends and acquaintances to start hosting elaborate, sunlight-drenched, EDM-filled swingers parties. Husson doesn’t ignore the students who abstain, but she’s utterly entranced by the excesses, risks, and temptations of George’s universe—a pulsating, slow-motion bacchanal pitched somewhere between the world of Spring Breakers and that of Larry Clark. A Samuel Goldwyn Films release. U.S. Premiere
Friday, March 4, 9:15pm (Q&A with Eva Husson)
Sunday, March 6, 1:00pm (Q&A with Eva Husson)

Dark Inclusion / Diamant noir 
Arthur Harari, France/Belgium, 2016, DCP, 115m
French with English subtitles

"You want them to pay? You have to be lucid, cool, precise. You go there, you see, and you take—that’s payback." Arthur Harari’s first feature is a poised, stylish, and utterly assured revenge thriller in which violence erupts suddenly amid tense, hushed stretches of talk. Pier Ulmann (Niels Schneider) comes from a family of powerful diamond dealers based in Anvers. After his estranged father’s death, he vows vengeance against his relatives who had abandoned him and returns to the business with an elaborate robbery in mind. Featuring menacing tracking shots; a cool, metallic color palette; surprising third-act reversals; and a terrific ensemble cast, Dark Inclusion is a movie precisely attuned to the logistical and moral complexities that accompany lives of luxurious crime. U.S. Premiere
Thursday, March 10, 1:30pm
Saturday, March 12, 9:15pm 

A Decent Man / Je ne suis pas un salaud
Emmanuel Finkiel, France, 2015, DCP, 111m
French with English subtitles
“I am not a bastard!” The literal French translation of the title of Emmanuel Finkiel’s taut, intelligent morality play captures its tone perhaps better than its American name. In the film’s first act, Eddy (Nicolas Duvauchelle) is in a position of strength. Having just been injured in a mugging, he’s earned the sympathy and attention of his estranged family and gotten back on his feet. The same cannot be said for Ahmed (Driss Ramdi), whose life starts falling apart after he’s wrongly accused of the crime. When the case against Ahmed starts to unravel, Eddy has to go back on the defensive…U.S. Premiere
Saturday, March 5, 1:00pm
Monday, March 7, 1:45pm

Disorder
Alice Winocour, France/Belgium, 2015, DCP, 101m
French with English subtitles
Alice Winocour’s follow-up to Augustine (Rendez-Vous 2013)—her study of the 19th-century neurologist Jean-Marie Charcot’s fraught relationship with one of his hysteria patients—is another finely tuned drama of unstable intimacy and mental imbalance. Having just returned from Afghanistan, Vincent (Matthias Schoenaerts) suffers from night terrors, pummeling headaches, and bouts of paranoia. To distract himself, he gets a job working security at the extravagant chateau of a Lebanese financier, whose beautiful wife (Diane Kruger) he’s soon hired to protect after the husband goes away on business. Disorder evolves from an exercise in nervous, slow-burn suspense into a tense domestic thriller. A Sundance Selects release.
Saturday, March 5, 6:30pm (Q&A with Alice Winocour)
Monday, March 7, 4:00pm

Fatima
Philippe Faucon, France, 2015, DCP, 79m
French and Arabic with English subtitles
Middle-aged single mother Fatima (Soria Zeroual) lives with her two teenage daughters and works cleaning jobs to pay their way through school. Inspired by a true story and the poetry of the North African writer Fatima Elayoubi, who immigrated knowing very little French and slowly taught herself the language, Faucon’s eighth feature—winner of the prestigious Louis Delluc Prize for Best French Film—is a patient, reflective study of a woman pressured by her children and her neighbors alike to assimilate into a culture of which she’s wary. Despite the display of everyday racism, both veiled and overt; internal domestic disputes; and external gestures of inhospitality, Fatima offers an uplifting experience and one of recent French cinema’s most trenchant and moving portraits of immigrant experience.
Friday, March 4, 2:00pm
Sunday, March 13, 4:00pm

The Great Game / Le Grand jeu
Nicolas Pariser, France, 2015, DCP, 100m
French with English subtitles
Pierre (Melvil Poupaud), a onetime darling novelist disgusted with the publishing world, lets a duplicitous government insider (André Dussollier) tempt him into ghostwriting a manifesto designed to transform the landscape of French public opinion—a shift with risky consequences for the activist (Clémence Poésy) with whom he soon becomes involved. Nicolas Pariser’s debut feature is an elegant political thriller that makes much use of its stellar cast, particularly with the brittle, uneasy rapport between Poupaud—the soulful young man at the center of Eric Rohmer’s A Summer’s Tale and Xavier Dolan’s Laurence Anyways—and Dussollier, a resourceful and protean actor who commits to his character’s malevolence with relish. U.S. Premiere
Friday, March 4, 6:30pm (Q&A with Nicolas Pariser, Clémence Poésy and Melvil Poupaud)
Saturday, March 5, 9:15pm (Q&A with Nicolas Pariser, Clémence Poésy and Melvil Poupaud)

Lolo
Julie Delpy, France, 2015, DCP, 99m
French with English subtitles
Writer, director, actor, composer: Julie Delpy is one of current French cinema’s great renaissance talents. In her new movie, a four-string black comedy that develops on the thinking at work in her recent 2 Days in New York, a world-weary fashionista (Delpy) finds her happy new relationship with a divorced, slightly unpolished computer programmer (Dany Boon) threatened by the machinations of her wheeling, malevolent son (Vincent Lacoste). Delpy is a filmmaker with a wise, prickly comic sensibility, and her movies often slide—like screwball comedies—from cerebral verbal banter to outright farce. Lolo is no exception, although it’s also her darkest, riskiest, and most startling movie to date. A FilmRise release. U.S. Premiere
Tuesday, March 8, 6:30pm (Q&A with Julie Delpy and composer Mathieu Lamboley)
Wednesday, March 9, 9:30pm (Introduction by Julie Delpy)

Much Loved
Nabil Ayouch, France/Morocco, 2015, DCP, 104m
Arabic and French with English subtitles
“What do you know about men?” a voice asks over the opening credits of Nabil Ayouch’s provocative portrait of several female sex workers in Marrakech. “Men are like makes [of cars]: high-end, medium, and sons of bitches. All that matters is the cash.” Noha (Loubna Abidar), Randa (Asmaa Lazrak), and Soukaina (Halima Karaouane) are professional, thick-skinned, and practical about their line of work, which ferries them up and down the city’s class ladder and renders them vulnerable to a catalog of possible abuses. Controversially banned in Morocco for its “contempt for moral values,” Much Loved offers such a candid and unblinking picture of a subculture that it’s a perilous job to represent on screen.
Thursday, March 10, 7:00pm
Friday, March 11, 4:00pm

My King / Mon roi
Maïwenn, France, 2015, DCP, 128m
French with English subtitles
Tony (Emmanuelle Bercot, in a performance that won her the Best Actress Award at Cannes) and Georgio (Vincent Cassel) are an odd match—or so Tony’s brother Solal (Louis Garrel) thinks when she tells him that they’re falling quickly, recklessly in love. Actor-director Maïwenn’s fourth feature captures the couple’s tempestuous 10-year relationship in retrospect as a string of flash points, eruptions, betrayals, tender reconciliations, and life-altering decisions. At the center of My King’s wide, expansive frames are Bercot and Cassel for nearly every second of its runtime, and the movie stakes itself on their harrowingly committed, nerve-fraying performances. Maïwenn’s formidable new film is one of French cinema’s most memorable recent amour fous. U.S. Premiere
Wednesday, March 9, 6:30pm (Q&A with Maïwenn and Louis Garrel)
Thursday, March 10, 9:45pm (Introduction by Maïwenn)

The New Kid / Le Nouveau
Rudi Rosenberg, France, 2015, DCP, 81m
French with English subtitles
In this delectable and vivacious debut feature, shy 14-year-old Benoît (Réphaël Ghrenassia) moves to Paris and a new high school, where he’s rejected by his cooler classmates and reluctantly sidelined into a precarious friendship with the “freaks and geeks.” The New Kid is a rare case among coming-of-age movies: a portrait of allegiances made and broken among middle-schoolers that calls special attention to the uglier, less picturesque aspects of passing through puberty. The movie’s rhythm never stalls and its tone stays charmingly light partly thanks to its wonderful cast—a skilled and magnetic group of first-time young actors. U.S. Premiere
Monday, March 7, 6:30pm (Q&A with Rudi Rosenberg)
Wednesday, March 9, 1:30pm

Parisienne / Peur de rien
Danielle Arbid, France, 2015, DCP, 120m
French with English subtitles
The French title of Danielle Arbid’s fourth feature, a luminous study of a young Lebanese woman restlessly accommodating herself to her new home in Paris during the mid-’90s, translates to “fear of nothing.” Lina might sometimes be afraid, but—as played by the great young actress Manal Issa—she’s also intrepid, adventurous, confident, independent, and breathtakingly self-possessed. Parisienne follows her as she flees the abusive uncle in whose care she’s been placed, flits from bed to bed, passes in and out of university classes, makes friends on both extreme sides of the political spectrum, takes a handful of lovers, and, in the movie’s climax, fights a legal battle to stay in the city that’s become hers.
Thursday, March 10, 4:00pm (Q&A with Danielle Arbid)
Saturday, March 12, 1:30pm (Q&A with Danielle Arbid)

Standing Tall / La Tête haute
Emmanuelle Bercot, France, 2015, DCP, 119m
French with English subtitles
Emmanuelle Bercot’s fourth feature, which opened last year’s Cannes, is a candid, sympathetic, impassioned study of a teenage delinquent surrounded by adults both callous and supportive. On the latter side is a warm-hearted juvenile court judge (Catherine Deneuve) and a devoted social worker (Benoît Magimel); on the other side stand, it can seem, most other authority figures. Sixteen-year-old Malony (Rod Paradot) is clearly a victim of his circumstances and poor parenting from his basket case of a mother (Sara Forestier), but he’s also a bully, a brute, and a sexually violent offender. Part of the strength of Standing Tall is that it refuses to entirely absolve its central character; instead, it counts on Paradot, a powerful new actor, to render him as a convincingly troubled, tempestuous soul. A Cohen Media release.
Sunday, March 6, 3:30pm (Q&A with Emmanuelle Bercot)
Sunday, March 6, 9:00pm (Introduction by Emmanuelle Bercot)

Story of Judas / Histoire de Judas
Rabah Ameur-Zaïmeche, France, 2015, DCP, 99m
French with English subtitles
French-Algerian director-actor Rabah Ameur-Zaïmeche boldly renders the final days of Jesus of Nazareth from the perspective of Judas Iscariot in this utterly novel reenvisioning of the key biblical tale. Ameur-Zaïmeche himself stars as Judas, Jesus’s closest disciple, as the two men find themselves swept up in political tumult amid tensions between the Jews and the Romans over the escalating popularity of the man who claims to be the Son of God. Story of Judas is both strikingly stylized (with shimmering, physical cinematography by Irina Lubtchansky, daughter of the late, legendary DP William) and compelling in its engagement with the myth of Judas, interweaving recent revelations about the role he may or may not have played in the real-life Passion story. The result is a ravishing and genuinely new addition to the Jesus film canon. Winner of a Jury Prize in the Forum section at last year’s Berlinale. U.S. Premiere
Saturday, March 5, 3:45pm
Tuesday, March 8, 1:45pm

Summertime / La Belle saison
Catherine Corsini, France/Belgium, 2015, DCP, 105m
French with English subtitles
Acclaimed director Catherine Corsini has made melodramas that range in tone from the bleak and violent to the tender and emotionally warm. At first glance, her Locarno prize-winning new film is one of her brightest and most bucolic. Soon after Delphine (Izïa Higelin) moves from her conservative parents’ farm near Limoges to Paris in 1971, she meets the older Carole (Cécile de France), a feminist organizer with whom she embarks on a passionate, mutually invigorating love affair. When a family sickness pulls Delphine back to the farm, Carole has to decide whether to follow her into hostile territory—and Summertime becomes something more complicated and fraught than its seductive, luminous visual palette initially suggests. A Strand Releasing release. U.S. Premiere
Tuesday, March 8, 9:15pm (Introduction by composer Gregoire Hetzel)
Saturday, March 12, 4:30pm

Three Sisters / Les Trois soeurs
Valeria Bruni Tedeschi, France, 2015, DCP, 110m
French with English subtitles
“Life is hard. It seems to many of us dull and hopeless; but yet we must admit that it goes on getting clearer and easier, and it looks as though the time were not far off when it'll be full of happiness.” For her latest project, commissioned by Arte and starring members of the Comédie-Française, Valeria Bruni Tedeschi shot an idiosyncratic, half-modernized adaptation of one of Chekhov’s greatest, most expansively melancholy plays. The three sisters of the title—two unmarried, one unhappily married—congregate in their family’s ancestral house and, along with the additional soldiers, debtors, pensioners, and spouses who populate the play, struggle to give their futures a shape. From a translation by André Markowicz and Françoise Morvan. U.S. Premiere
Wednesday, March 9, 3:30pm (Q&A with Valeria Bruni Tedeschi)
Friday, March 11, 6:30pm (Q&A with Valeria Bruni Tedeschi)

Two Friends / Deux amis
Louis Garrel, France, 2015, DCP, 102m
French with English subtitles
One of France’s most distinguished and recognizable actors for over a decade now, Louis Garrel makes his much-anticipated feature-length directorial debut with this clever and moving twist on the ménage à trois. Garrel stars as Abel, a gas-station attendant with literary ambitions, an underage girlfriend, and an always-active libido. Abel is all too accustomed to seducing away the crushes of his best friend, movie-extra Vincent (Vincent Macaigne)—but when an incognito convict working at a pastry counter in the Gare du Nord (Golshifteh Farahani) enters Vincent’s orbit (and, by extension, Abel’s), a comic, manic, and eminently romantic love triangle soon unfolds. Co-written by his frequent collaborator Christophe Honoré, Two Friends marks an auspicious and heartfelt first feature for Garrel, striking a pitch-perfect balance between tragedy and charm. U.S. Premiere
Sunday, March 6, 6:30pm (Q&A with Louis Garrel)
Monday, March 7, 9:00pm (Introduction by Louis Garrel)

Winter Song / Chant d’hiver
Otar Iosseliani, France, 2015, DCP, 117m
French with English subtitles
There’s no mistaking the tone and structure of a film by the 81-year-old Georgian director Otar Iosseliani: caustic, mordant, detached, extremely funny, and dizzyingly panoramic. Like several of his earlier films, Winter Song doesn’t center on a single figure so much as a dense cluster of interrelated characters, all united by objects (an executed aristocrat’s skull), places (the apartment building where most of them live), historical events (from the French Revolution to the Russo-Georgian War), and pure coincidence. An aging upper-crust patriarch burning his letters; a tramp hoping to avoid the advances of a steamroller; an 18th-century nobleman who insists on taking his pipe to the guillotine: Winter Song is a well-stocked encyclopedia of human variety, eccentricity, and folly, elevated by an exquisite cast that include Rufus, Pierre Étaix, and Mathieu Amalric. U.S. Premiere
Tuesday, March 8, 4:00pm
Friday, March 11, 9:15pm

UNIFRANCE
Founded in 1949, UniFrance is a government-sponsored association of French film industry professionals dedicated to the international promotion of French films. With offices in Paris, New York, Tokyo, Mumbai, and Beijing, UniFrance provides financial and logistical support to theatrical distributors and major film festivals, and showcase recent French cinema throughout the world, partly through their online French film festival. For more information, visithttp://en.unifrance.org/.

FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER
Founded in 1969 to celebrate American and international cinema, the Film Society of Lincoln Center works to recognize established and emerging filmmakers, support important new work, and to enhance the awareness, accessibility, and understanding of the moving image. The Film Society produces the renowned New York Film Festival, a curated selection of the year’s most significant new film work, and presents or collaborates on other annual New York City festivals including Art of the Real, Dance on Camera, Film Comment Selects, Human Rights Watch Film Festival, New Directors/New Films, New York African Film Festival, New York Asian Film Festival, New York Jewish Film Festival, Open Roads: New Italian Cinema, Rendez-Vous with French Cinema, and Scary Movies. In addition to publishing the award-winning Film Comment magazine, the Film Society recognizes an artist’s unique achievement in film with the prestigious Chaplin Award, whose 2015 recipient was Robert Redford. The Film Society’s state-of-the-art Walter Reade Theater and the Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, located at Lincoln Center, provide a home for year-round programs and the New York City film community.

The Film Society receives generous, year-round support from American Airlines, The New York Times, HBO, Stella Artois, The Kobal Collection, Variety, Loews Regency Hotel, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the New York State Council on the Arts. For more information, visit www.filmlinc.org and follow @filmlinc on Twitter.

ACADEMY’S OSCAR® WEEK EVENTS CELEBRATE THIS YEAR’S NOMINEES

Oscars

LOS ANGELES, CA – In the week leading up to the 88th Oscars®, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences will present a series of public programs celebrating this year’s nominees in the Animated Feature Film, Documentary Feature, Documentary Short Subject, Foreign Language Film, Makeup and Hairstyling, and Animated and Live Action Short Film categories.  All events will be held at the Academy’s Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills.

The Oscar® Week schedule is as follows:

OSCAR WEEK: SHORTS

Tuesday, February 23, 7 p.m.

Hosted by director Jennifer Yuh Nelson

Yuh Nelson received an Oscar nomination in the Animated Feature Film category for “Kung Fu Panda 2” and is the director of the sequel “Kung Fu Panda 3,” currently in theaters.  The program will delve into the Animated Short Film and Live Action Short Film categories with complete screenings of all the nominated films as well as onstage panel discussions with the filmmakers (schedules permitting).   

OSCAR WEEK: DOCUMENTARIES

Wednesday, February 24, 7:30 p.m. 

Hosted by Documentary Branch governors Kate Amend and Rory Kennedy

Amend is a film editor whose documentary feature credits include “The Case against 8” and the Oscar winners “Into the Arms of Strangers: Stories of the Kindertransport” and “The Long Way Home.”  Kennedy is a producer-director who received an Oscar nomination last year for the documentary feature “Last Days in Vietnam.”  Her other credits include “Ethel” and “Ghosts of Abu Ghraib.”  All the films nominated in Documentary Feature and Documentary Short Subject categories this year will be presented in an evening of clips and onstage discussions with the filmmakers (schedules permitting). 

OSCAR WEEK: ANIMATED FEATURES

Thursday, February 25, 7:30 p.m.

Hosted by producer Roy Conli and directors Don Hall and Chris Williams

Conli, Hall and Williams took home Animated Feature Film Oscars last year for “Big Hero 6.”  Conli’s other feature credits include “Tangled” and “The Hunchback of Notre Dame.”  Hall made his feature directorial debut with “Winnie the Pooh.”  Williams previously received an Oscar nomination as the co-director of “Bolt.”  This year’s nominees in the Animated Feature Film category (schedules permitting) will talk about their creative processes and present clips illustrating their techniques.

OSCAR WEEK: FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILMS

Saturday, February 27, 10 a.m. 

Hosted by Producers Branch governor Mark Johnson

Johnson won the 1988 Best Picture Oscar for “Rain Man” and received a second nomination for “Bugsy.”  The directors of the nominated films in the Foreign Language Film category (schedules permitting) will explore a wide range of topics, from their experiences developing their projects to the specific challenges of their profession.  The program will include clips from each of the nominated films.

OSCAR WEEK: MAKEUP AND HAIRSTYLING SYMPOSIUM

Saturday, February 27, 3 p.m. 

Moderated by makeup artist Leonard Engelman

Engelman, a longtime governor of the Makeup Artists and Hairstylists Branch, has served as a makeup artist on such features as “Burlesque,” “Heat,” “Moonstruck” and “Ghostbusters.”  In Oscar Week’s final public event, the nominees in the Makeup and Hairstyling category (schedules permitting) will reveal the secrets behind their on-screen work.  Photographs, appliances, molds, wigs and other items will be on display in the theater lobby.

Tickets are now available online at Oscars.org.  Tickets to the Shorts, Docs, Animated Features and Foreign Language Films events are $5 for the general public and $3 for Academy members and students with a valid ID (Shorts and Foreign Language Films tickets limited to four per person).  Admission to the Saturday afternoon Makeup and Hairstyling event is free, but advance tickets are required (limited to two per person).  The Academy’s Samuel Goldwyn Theater is located at 8949 Wilshire Boulevard in Beverly Hills.  Doors open one hour prior to each event.  All ticketed seating is unreserved.  For more information, visit Oscars.org or call (310) 247-3600.

The 88th Oscars will be held on Sunday, February 28, at the Dolby Theatre® at Hollywood & Highland Center® in Hollywood, and will be televised live by the ABC Television Network at 7 p.m. ET/4 p.m. PT.  The Oscar presentation also will be televised live in more than 225 countries and territories worldwide.

 

January 30, 2016

STAR WARS: EPISODE VII - THE FORCE AWAKENS

January 29, 2016

OLIVIA MUNN AND JASON SEGEL TO HOST ACADEMY’S SCI-TECH AWARDS

Oscars

 LOS ANGELES, CA – Actors Olivia Munn and Jason Segel will host the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ Scientific and Technical Awards Presentation on Saturday, February 13, at the Beverly Wilshire in Beverly Hills.  They will present 11 awards to 33 individual recipients and the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers during the evening.

“The Sci-Tech Awards Presentation is one of our special events during Oscar® season, and we’re thrilled to have Olivia and Jason as this year’s hosts,” said Academy President Cheryl Boone Isaacs.  “Their humor and charm will be terrific complements to the brilliance of our colleagues and their outstanding scientific and technical achievements.”

Munn’s feature film credits include “Ride Along 2,” now in theaters, as well as “Mortdecai,” “Deliver Us from Evil” and “Magic Mike.”  She also starred in the critically acclaimed series “The Newsroom” for three seasons.  Munn will appear as Psylocke in the upcoming X-Men sequel “X-Men: Apocalypse.”

Segel currently stars in James Ponsoldt’s dramatic biopic, “The End of the Tour,” in which he plays David Foster Wallace. His other film credits include “Forgetting Sarah Marshall” (writer), “The Muppets” (writer, producer), “Get Him to the Greek” (writer, co-producer), “I Love You, Man” and “Knocked Up.”  On television, Segel starred in “How I Met Your Mother” and “Freaks and Geeks.” Additionally, Segel is an author for a children’s middle-grade fiction series titled “Nightmares!”

Portions of the Scientific and Technical Awards Presentation will be included in the Oscar telecast.

Popular Mechanics is a proud supporter of the Scientific and Technical Awards.

The 88th Oscars® will be held on Sunday, February 28, 2016, at the Dolby Theatre® at Hollywood & Highland Center® in Hollywood, and will be televised live on the ABC Television Network at 7 p.m. ET/4 p.m. PT.  The Oscars also will be televised live in more than 225 countries and territories worldwide.

January 28, 2016

MEET THE BLACKS

Meet the Blacks

Feast your eyes on the first poster for Mike Epps’ hilarious new comedy “Meet the Blacks.” The film will release nationwide on April Fool’s Day (April 1st) – no joke! In the meantime, check out the trailer here http://bit.ly/1PlUP8b

From writer/director/producer Deon Taylor, “Meet the Blacks” is comedy/horror hybrid spoofing the hit film “The Purge,” and stars Mike Epps (“The Hangover,” “50 Shades of Black,” “Resident Evil: Apocalypse”),George Lopez (“Lopez Tonight,” “Swing Vote,” “Balls of Fury”), Mike Tyson(“The Hangover” series “Scary Movie 5”), Bresha Webb (NBC’s “Truth Be Told”), Zulay Henao (“True Memoirs of An International Assassin”) as well as a ‘who’s who’ of pop culture personalities including Gary Owen (“Ride Along”) Charlie Murphy (“The Chappelle Show”), Tameka “Tiny” Cottle(VH1’s TI & Tiny with Rap artist husband TI), gossip columnist Perez Hilton,Paul Mooney (Richard Pryor’s longtime writing partner), Vine star Andrew Bachelor, and comedians Lil Duvall, DeRay Davis and Lavell Crawford

“Meet the Blacks” is written, produced and directed by former pro basketball player turned filmmaker Deon Taylor (“Supremacy” “Chain Letter,” “Dead Tone”).

Roxanne Avent (“Nite Tales,” “The Hustle,” “Free Agents”) and Shannon McIntosh (“The Hateful Eight,” “Django Unchained,” “Inglorious Basterds”) produced the film alongside Taylor. Executive producers are Mike Epps, NBA star Tony Parker, Michael Finley, Venu Kondle and Derek Dudley.  Freestyle Releasing will distribute the film nationwide.

Original music for the film is written, produced and performed by RZA, the iconic producer, multi-instrumentalist, author, rapper, actor, director, composer, and screenwriter. RZA is also an executive producer.

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