August 26, 2016

NEW BEVERLY CINEMA: SEPTEMBER 2016 SCHEDULE

New Beverly 9:16

If We Did Other Things The Way That We Vote by TED RALL

A lot of people don't want to vote for a third-party candidate like Jill Stein or Gary Johnson because they believe their vote will be "wasted." But they don't apply the same logic to most other things in life, many of which involve setting yourself apart from the herd.

A lot of people don’t want to vote for a third-party candidate like Jill Stein or Gary Johnson because they believe their vote will be “wasted.” But they don’t apply the same logic to most other things in life, many of which involve setting yourself apart from the herd.

August 23, 2016

NYFF 54 SPECIAL GUESTS OF HONOR

THE FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER ANNOUNCES SPECIAL EVENTS AND “AN EVENING WITH…” GUESTS OF HONOR FOR 54th NEW YORK FILM FESTIVAL

Special Events include Jim Jarmusch’s Gimme Danger, the World Premiere of Alex Horwitz’s Hamilton’s America, Film Comment Presents Terence Davies’s A Quiet Passion, Lonny Price’s Best Worst Thing That Ever Could Have Happened, plus special guests Jarmusch, Davies, Iggy Pop, Cynthia Nixon, Stephen Sondheim, and more

NYFF54

Kristen Stewart and Adam Driver are this year’s
“An Evening with…” honorees

New York, NY (August 23, 2016) – The Film Society of Lincoln Center announces the Special Events section and “An Evening with…” honorees for the 54th New York Film Festival.

Special Events will feature the world premiere of Lonny Price’s Best Worst Thing That Ever Could Have Happened, a nonfiction account of Stephen Sondheim and Harold Prince’s 1981 musical-flop-turned-cult-favorite Merrily We Roll Along, with Price and theater luminary Sondheim in person. Thirty-five years later in the world of musicals, Hamilton is a Broadway sensation. Alex Horwitz’s Hamilton’s America goes behind the history of Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Tony- and Pulitzer Prize–winning production,Hamilton: An American Musical, and makes its world premiere at NYFF with the director and special guests to be announced. The Film Society will do outreach to young audiences for the screening, which debuts in advance of its PBS Great Performancesbroadcast on October 21. Festival veteran Jim Jarmusch brings a second film to NYFF (in addition to Main Slate selectionPaterson) with the U.S. premiere of Gimme Danger, a documentary chronicling the history of legendary proto-punk band The Stooges. Jarmusch and Stooges front man Iggy Pop will appear in person for the screening.

The fourth annual Film Comment Presents selection is Terence Davies’s A Quiet Passion, starring Cynthia Nixon as celebrated American poet Emily Dickinson. In previous years, Film Comment has championed films such as Steve McQueen’s 12 Years a Slave and László Nemes’s Son of Saul, and Davies’s anticipated new work comes on the heels of his breathtaking Sunset Song, which opened the annual Film Comment Selects festival earlier this year. The magazine will have an expanded presence at this year’s festival with two special panels: a roundtable discussion with festival filmmakers about their experiences as movie lovers and creators, and an in-depth look at the September-October issue with the magazine’s editors and contributors, examining the state of cinema today.

The annual “An Evening with…” events recognize the work of individuals who have made significant artistic contributions to film culture, and this year’s honorees are Kristen Stewart and Adam Driver, two of the brightest young actors working today. Driver gives a remarkable performance in Jim Jarmusch’s Paterson, and Stewart shines in three New York Film Festival titles: Kelly Reichardt’s Certain Women, Olivier Assayas’s Personal Shopper, and Ang Lee’s Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk, previously announced as a special World Premiere presentation in the Special Events section. Each of the evenings will include dinner and an intimate conversation between the award-winning actors and NYFF Director Kent Jones, and will serve as a benefit for the Film Society.

NYFF previously announced the world premieres of Ava DuVernay’s documentary The 13th as the Opening Night selection, Mike Mills’s 20th Century Women as Centerpiece, and James Gray’s The Lost City of Z as Closing Night. The complete Main Slate lineup can be found here, along with the complete programs for Convergence, Projections, Revivals, and Retrospective.

Tickets for the 54th New York Film Festival will go on sale September 11. To learn more about NYFF tickets, including a complete list of on-sale dates, prices, discount options, and our rush and standby policies, click here.

For even more access, VIP passes and subscription packages offer the earliest opportunities to purchase tickets and secure seats at some of the festival's biggest events including Opening and Closing Nights, and Centerpiece. VIP passes also provide access to many exciting events, including the invitation-only Opening Night party, “An Evening With…” dinner, Filmmaker Brunch, and VIP Lounge. Benefits vary based on the pass or package type purchased. VIP passes and subscription packages are on sale now. Learn more at filmlinc.org/NYFF.

FILMS & DESCRIPTIONS

Best Worst Thing That Ever Could Have Happened
Directed by Lonny Price
USA, DCP, 95m
World Premiere
In 1981, Stephen Sondheim and Harold Prince embarked on Merrily We Roll Along, a musical based on the 1934 George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart comedy told in reverse: the characters begin as disillusioned adults and end as starry-eyed adolescents. Though the original, much-ballyhooed production, which featured a cast of teenage unknowns, was panned by the critics and closed after just 16 performances, Merrily We Roll Along would go on to attain musical theater legend status. This alternately heartbreaking and euphoric film by original cast member Lonny Price features never-before seen footage of Prince and Sondheim at work on the show and revisits many of Price’s fellow actors, all of them united by this once-in-a-lifetime experience. Stephen Sondheim, Lonny Price, and other special guests to appear in person.

Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk
Directed by Ang Lee
USA, 2016, DCP, 110m
World Premiere
Ang Lee’s stunning adaptation of Ben Fountain’s novel is the story of an Iraq war hero (newcomer Joe Alwyn) who comes home with his fellow members of Bravo Company for a victory tour. This culminates in a halftime show at a Thanksgiving Day football game—a high-intensity media extravaganza summoning memories of the trauma of losing his beloved sergeant in a firefight. Lee’s brave, heartbreaking film goes right to the heart of a great division that haunts this country: between the ideal image of things as they should be and the ongoing reality of things as they are. Billy Lynn is also a step forward in the art of cinema, made with a cinematographic process years ahead of its time. With a brilliant supporting cast, including Kristen Stewart, Chris Tucker, Garrett Hedlund, with Vin Diesel and Steve Martin. A TriStar Pictures release.

Gimme Danger
Directed by Jim Jarmusch
USA, 2016, DCP, 108m
U.S. Premiere
“Music is life and life is not a business,” said Iggy Pop when he and his surviving bandmates from The Stooges were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2010. Jim Jarmusch’s cinematic offering to the punk gods of Ann Arbor traces the always raucous and frequently calamitous history of the Stooges from inception to the present. With the help of animator James Kerr, plus glimpses of Lucille Ball and a shirtless Yul Brynner amidst a bonanza of archival performance footage, photos, and interviews,Gimme Danger has the feeling of a night at Max’s Kansas City. An Amazon Studios and Magnolia Pictures release. Iggy Pop and Jim Jarmusch to appear in person.

Hamilton’s America
Directed by Alex Horwitz
USA, 2016, DCP, 84m
World Premiere
Lin-Manuel Miranda takes us inside the making of his groundbreaking American musical Hamilton, winner of eleven Tonys, as well as the Pulitzer Prize and a Grammy Award. We follow Miranda, his collaborators, and key members of the original cast on their exploration of the history that inspired the show, visiting locations from Valley Forge to the West Wing. We also track the show's journey, from the moment Miranda thrilled the Obamas at the White House in 2009 to the first year of its blockbuster run on Broadway. A PBS Great Performances documentary. Horwitz and special guests to appear in person.

FILM COMMENT AT NYFF EVENTS

Film Comment Presents:
A Quiet Passion
Directed by Terence Davies
U.K./Belgium, 2016, DCP, 125m
Swiftly following his glorious Sunset Song, the great British director Terence Davies turns his attention to 19th-century American poet Emily Dickinson and ends up with perhaps an even greater triumph. A revelatory Cynthia Nixon embodies Dickinson with a titanic intelligence always threatening to burst forth from behind a polite facade, while Davies creates a formally audacious rendering of her life, from teenage skepticism to lonely death, using her poems (and a touch of Charles Ives) as soundtrack accompaniment. Both sides of Davies’s enormous talent—his witty, Wildean sense of humor and his frightening vision of life’s grim realities—are on full display in this consuming depiction of a creative inner world. Terence Davies and Cynthia Nixon to appear in person.

Film Comment Live: Living Cinema
For its September-October 2016 edition, Film Comment, the most important and renowned critical film magazine in the U.S. for more than 50 years, will come out of the gate with an issue devoted to the vitality of movies today, as well as an elaborate special section on films featured in the 54th New York Film Festival. For this panel a selection of the magazine’s editors, new contributors, and longtime writers will join to discuss issues raised and questions asked in its pages.

Film Comment Live: Filmmakers Chat
In this special roundtable discussion, a selection of different directors from around the world whose films are screening in this year’s New York Film Festival talk together in a discussion moderated by Film Comment editor Nicolas Rapold. It’s the rare chance to see some of today’s most important filmmakers in dialogue with each other, talking about their experiences watching and creating movies.

TWO SPECIAL “An Evening with . . .” CELEBRATIONS
The New York Film Festival tradition known as “An Evening with...” is a limited-seating event that includes an intimate dinner and conversation between an important star of the film world and NYFF Director Kent Jones. Past honorees include Pedro Almodóvar, Cate Blanchett, Ralph Fiennes, Nicole Kidman, Kate Winslet, and more. We’re pleased to announce that this year we are offering two of these special nights, featuring two of the brightest young actors working today.

An Evening with Adam Driver
With his mainstream breakout in last year’s Star Wars: The Force Awakens, Adam Driver has become a bona fide megastar. But those who have been following him for years, both in his Emmy-nominated role in the HBO series Girls, and in such past NYFF films as Frances Ha and Inside Llewyn Davis, have already been smitten with his artistic style. This year, festival audiences can see his wonderful leading performance in Jim Jarmusch’s exquisite Paterson, as a poetry-writing New Jersey bus driver.
Sunday, October 2

An Evening with Kristen Stewart
For the past few years, Kristen Stewart has been quietly amassing an impressive body of work, starring in enigmatic roles in complex films, including the NYFF52 selection Clouds of Sils Maria, directed by Olivier Assayas, for which she became the first American actor to win the French César award. This year feels like a culmination of this extraordinary phase of her career: she starred in five movies in 2016, the best of which are featured at NYFF: Assayas’s Personal Shopper, in which she appears in nearly every shot; Kelly Reichardt’s Certain Women; and Ang Lee’s Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk. All three films speak to an actor constantly willing to challenge herself and her fans.
Wednesday, October 5

FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER
The Film Society of Lincoln Center is devoted to supporting the art and elevating the craft of cinema. The only branch of the world-renowned arts complex Lincoln Center to shine a light on the everlasting yet evolving importance of the moving image, this nonprofit organization was founded in 1969 to celebrate American and international film. Via year-round programming and discussions; its annual New York Film Festival; and its publications, including Film Comment, the U.S.’s premier magazine about films and film culture, the Film Society endeavors to make the discussion and appreciation of cinema accessible to a broader audience, as well as to ensure that it will remain an essential art form for years to come.

The Film Society receives generous, year-round support from American Airlines, The New York Times, HBO, The Kobal Collection, Variety, Loews Regency Hotel, Row NYC Hotel, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the New York State Council on the Arts.

Support for the New York Film Festival is also generously provided by Jaeger-LeCoultre, the Mayor's Office of Media and Entertainment, and the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts.

For more information about the New York Film Festival, visit filmlinc.org/NYFF. For the latest news, subscribe to the festival’s newsletter, follow the festival on Facebook and Twitter, and use the hashtag: #NYFF.

August 22, 2016

Ira Sachs’s [CRITERION] DVD Picks

August 20, 2016

NYFF 54 RETROSPECTIVE LINE-UP

NYFF54

 

THE FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER ANNOUNCES ITS RETROSPECTIVE SECTION AT THE 54th NEW YORK FILM FESTIVAL

 

Bertrand Tavernier’s epic new documentary My Journey Through French Cinema inspires a two-part series, featuring a selection of French classics & 12 works by Hollywood director Henry Hathaway

 

New York, NY (August 19, 2016) – The Film Society of Lincoln Center announces the Retrospective section of the 54th New York Film Festival (September 30 – October 16), a two-part lineup headlined and inspired by Bertrand Tavernier’s magnificent epic documentary My Journey Through French Cinema: in addition to that film, NYFF will screen a selection of French classics featured in the documentary and a 12-film exploration of one of Tavernier’s favorite American directors, Henry Hathaway.

Tavernier is truly one of the grand old men of the movies: his experience is vast, his knowledge is voluminous, and his love is inexhaustible. Tavernier knows his native cinema inside and out, from the giants to now overlooked and forgotten figures, and in My Journey Through French Cinema, which will be released early next year by Cohen Media Group, his observations and reminiscences are never less than penetrating and always deeply personal.

The 2016 NYFF Retrospective complements screenings of Tavernier’s documentary with five rarely-screened titles featured within it: Jean Renoir’s glorious revolutionary epic La Marseillaise; Robert Bresson’s first film,Angels of Sin; Jacques Becker’s post–World War II comedy Antoine and Antoinette; Julien Duvivier’s final collaboration with Jean Gabin, Deadlier Than the Male; Jean-Pierre Melville’s Cocteau adaptation Les enfants terribles; as well as Tavernier’s own 2002 film about Occupation-era filmmaking, Safe Conduct.

Additionally, in line with Tavernier’s passionate devotion to American cinema throughout his career, the Retrospective section will feature a selection of films by a director he has always greatly admired and championed, Henry Hathaway. Born near the turn of the last century, Hathaway started during the silent era as an assistant to directors like Josef von Sternberg and Victor Fleming, and he directed the first of his 52 films at the dawn of the sound era. He developed into one of Hollywood’s greatest craftsmen and most respected artists, taking on every genre from western to film noir, adventure stories to rural melodramas; pioneering the docudrama and the practice of shooting on location; creating technically complex visual effects that are still surprising; and building one of the most satisfying bodies of work in American movies, from the celebrated Kiss of Death and Niagara, starring Marilyn Monroe, to the relatively unsung From Hell to Texasand Down to the Sea in Ships (all of which are screening in the series).

The Film Society of Lincoln Center would like to thank Jim Gianopulos and Schawn Belston from Fox, and Paul Ginsburg at NBC-Universal.

The 17-day New York Film Festival highlights the best in world cinema, featuring works from celebrated filmmakers as well as fresh new talent. The selection committee, chaired by Jones, also includes Dennis Lim, FSLC Director of Programming; Florence Almozini, FSLC Associate Director of Programming; Amy Taubin, Contributing Editor, Artforum and Film Comment; and Gavin Smith, who serves as a consultant.

NYFF previously announced Ava DuVernay’s documentary The 13th as the Opening Night selection, Mike Mills’s 20th Century Women as Centerpiece, and James Gray’s The Lost City of Z as Closing Night. The complete Main Slate lineup can be found here, along with the complete programs for Convergence, Revivals, and Projections.

Tickets for the 54th New York Film Festival will go on sale September 11. Becoming a Film Society Member at the Film Buff Level or above provides early ticket access to festival screenings and events ahead of the general public, along with the exclusive member ticket discount. Learn more at filmlinc.org/membership.

For even more access, VIP passes and subscription packages offer the earliest opportunities to purchase tickets and secure seats at some of the festival's biggest events including Opening and Closing Nights, and Centerpiece. VIP passes also provide access to many exciting events, including the invitation-only Opening Night party, “An Evening With…” dinner, Filmmaker Brunch, and VIP Lounge. Benefits vary based on the pass or package type purchased. VIP passes and subscription packages are on sale now. Learn more at filmlinc.org/NYFF.

FILMS & DESCRIPTIONS

A Brief Journey Through French Cinema

My Journey Through French Cinema
Directed by Bertrand Tavernier

France, 2016, 190m
Bertrand Tavernier is truly one of the grand old men of the movies. His experience is vast, his knowledge is voluminous, his love is inexhaustible, and his perspective is matched only by that of Martin Scorsese. This magnificent epic history has been a lifetime in the making. Tavernier knows his native cinema inside and out, from the giants like Renoir, Godard, and Melville (for whom he worked as an assistant) to now overlooked and forgotten figures like Edmund T. Gréville and Guy Gilles, and his observations and reminiscences are never less than penetrating and always deeply personal. A Cohen Media Group release.

Angels of Sin / Les anges du péché
Directed by Robert Bresson
France, 1943, 96m, French with English subtitles
Robert Bresson’s first feature, made during the occupation, was this melodrama about a nun (Renée Faure) from a wealthy background who zeroes in on the distressed condition of a poor young female prisoner (Jany Holt) who has been sent to the convent for rehabilitation. Les anges du péché, co-written by Bresson with the French dramatist Jean Giraudoux and the Dominican priest and author Raymond Léopold Bruckberger, is an emotionally overpowering experience. If we don’t quite recognize the Bresson we would come to know, this is also a formidable debut from a filmmaker who, in David Bordwell’s words, had “proven his virtuosity” and, in the process, created what Jacques Becker recognized as “a whole new style.” A Janus Films release.

Antoine and Antoinette / Antoine et Antoinette
Directed by Jacques Becker
France, 1947, 84m, French with English subtitles
This postwar comedy about a young Parisian couple (Roger Pigaut and Claire Mafféi) who buy and lose a winning lottery ticket sings with the energies of working-class life. Antoine et Antoinette is temperamentally close to the great American pre-Code films of the early 30s, but it is made with a verve and grace that could only originate with one individual sensibility. To quote Godard on the occasion of Jacques Becker’s death at the age of 53: “There are several good ways of making French films. Italian style, like Renoir. Viennese, like Ophuls. New Yorker, like Melville. But only Becker was and is as French as France.” A Rialto Pictures release.

Deadlier Than the Male / Voici le temps des assassins
Directed by Julien Duvivier
France, 1956, 113m, French with English subtitles
Julien Duvivier’s final collaboration with Jean Gabin is the gut-wrenching and ultimately tragic story of a Parisian restaurant owner who one day finds a young woman (Danièle Delorme) claiming to be the daughter of his ex-wife on his doorstep. Deadlier Than the Male, whose original French title is a quote from Rimbaud’s “Illuminations,” is, like all the best Duvivier films, beautifully crafted and visualized (Truffaut reckoned that it was his very best), with excellent location shooting in Les Halles. And in the words of Delorme, who passed away last year at the age of 89, the film “immortalized our youth and a certain type of moviemaking.” A Pathé release.

Les enfants terribles
Directed by Jean-Pierre Melville
France, 1950, 106m, French with English subtitles
Jacques Rivette claimed that on the night he happened upon the set of this adaptation of Jean Cocteau’s 1929 novel about the alternate world created by an orphaned brother and sister, director Jean-Pierre Melville was nowhere in sight and Cocteau himself was directing the crew. The tension between director and writer was ongoing, but it was also productive, because the final film—in Manny Farber’s words, a “macabre melodrama about incestuous adolescence” that “rates top honors in every film department”—is an unlikely, incongruous mesh of their two vastly different sensibilities. To quote Truffaut, “The best novel of Jean Cocteau became the best film of Jean-Pierre Melville.” With Édouard Dermit and Nicole Stéphane. A Janus Films release.

La Marseillaise
Directed by Jean Renoir
France, 1938, 132m, French with English subtitles
Jean Renoir’s 1938 film about the beginnings of the French Revolution, made with the support of France’s most powerful labor union, is, in François Truffaut’s words, a “neorealist fresco” that continually shuttles between characters throughout the social spectrum: peasants living in the mountains, emigrés from Coblenz, Louis XVI (Renoir’s brother Pierre) and his courtiers. A glorious and, today, lesser-known film from one of the cinema’s greatest directors, whose goal, according to André Bazin, “is to go beyond the historical images to uncover the mundane human reality.” With Louis Jouvet and Renoir regulars Gaston Modot, Nadia Sibirskaïa, and Julien Carette. Print courtesy of French Cultural Services. A Rialto Pictures release.

Safe Conduct / Laissez-passer
Directed by Bertrand Tavernier
France/Germany/Spain, 2002, 170m, French with English subtitles
Bertrand Tavernier’s vigorous and varied portrait of Occupation-era filmmaking in France achieves a Breugelesque richness of perspective—this is a story told by a director deeply in love with his subject. Tavernier’s hero is ace assistant director Jean-Devaivre (Jacques Gamblin), who helps directors like Maurice Tourneur (Philippe Morier-Genoud) bring their most difficult visual ideas to life, negotiates his way through the German hierarchy at Continental Films, and works for the Resistance. With Denis Podalydès in the role of screenwriter (and future Tavernier collaborator) Jean Aurenche, Dardenne regular Olivier Gourmet as producer Roger Richebé, and Laurent Schilling as the screenwriter Charles Spaak.

Henry Hathaway

23 Paces to Baker Street
Directed by Henry Hathaway

USA, 1956, 103m
In this ingenious, light yet genuinely suspenseful mystery, Van Johnson plays a blind American playwright living in London who sits down for a drink in his neighborhood pub one night and overhears a casual plan to commit murder. A beautifully mounted London travelogue in color and Scope, 23 Paces to Baker Street is among the best of the numerous British-set American studio pictures of the era, featuring a succession of expertly mounted set-pieces (the best of which are set in a bustling department store and an abandoned building). With Cecil Parker and Vera Miles as Johnson’s partners in detection. A 20th Century-Fox release.

The Dark Corner
Directed by Henry Hathaway
USA, 1946, 99m
This 1946 melodrama, about a Manhattan P.I. (Mark Stevens) whose adoring secretary (Lucille Ball, who clashed with Hathaway on the set) helps to clear him of a false murder accusation, is the essence of what has come to be known as film noir, from Joseph MacDonald’s stark, shadowy images to the title itself. Made in the wake of Laura’s massive success, the film also stars Clifton Webb as the posh owner of a Manhattan art gallery and features the same clash between the upper crust and the hard-boiled. With William Bendix as the menacing hood on Stevens’ tail. A 20th Century-Fox release.

Down to the Sea in Ships
Directed by Henry Hathaway
USA, 1949, 120m
This lovely film, about a sea captain (Lionel Barrymore) who sets out on a final whaling voyage from New Bedford in 1878 with his grandson (Dean Stockwell) and his young successor (Richard Widmark), is a perfect blend of Hathaway’s special artistry and Fox’s meticulous period craftsmanship. Hathaway and Barrymore had their difficulties on set (assistant director Richard Talmadge doubled for Barrymore in many of his more demanding scenes), but the actor gives a deeply moving performance in his final starring role. Hathaway achieved many technical wonders throughout his career, and the sequence in which the ship runs through a field of icebergs in dense fog is one of his most remarkable. A 20th Century Fox release.

Fourteen Hours
Directed by Henry Hathaway
USA, 1951, 92m
An exciting low-budget film shot on the streets of lower Manhattan, Fourteen Hours is based on the true story of William Warde, who jumped to his death in 1938 after a policeman had spent hours trying to talk him down from a 17th floor ledge at the old Gotham Hotel (now the Peninsula). Richard Basehart (whose wife Stephanie died during production) gives a brilliant performance as the suicidal young man, Paul Douglas is the cop, and the film is packed with formidable character performances (from the likes of Agnes Moorehead, Howard Da Silva, and newcomer Grace Kelly) and vividly cast faces in the crowd below, including those of Ossie Davis, Joyce Van Patten, Brian Keith, and John Cassavetes. A 20th Century-Fox release.

From Hell to Texas
Directed by Henry Hathaway
USA, 1958, 100m
A peaceful cowboy (Don Murray) who kills a man in self-defense is stalked across Texas by the man’s father, a powerful cattle baron (R.G. Armstrong). He is sheltered along the way by a gentle rancher (Chill Wills) and his daughter (Diane Varsi). This unheralded film, one of Hathaway’s very best, has much in common with Peckinpah’s work, but it has a hard-edged relentlessness of its own. From Hell to Texas features a raw, emotional performance from Dennis Hopper as Armstrong’s younger son. The legend goes that Hopper and Hathaway had an “artistic disagreement” resulting in dozens of takes, but if so, they got over it: they worked together twice more in the next decade. A 20th Century-Fox release.

Garden of Evil
Directed by Henry Hathaway
USA/Mexico, 1951, 103m
Gary Cooper, Richard Widmark, and Cameron Mitchell are a trio of gold hunters approached by a desperate woman (Susan Hayward) with a generous offer to find her husband (Hugh Marlowe), who is trapped in their gold mine in an area deep in unforgiving Mexican hill country, known as the “Garden of Evil.” Hathaway’s westerns are all on the tough side, and this film, shot on location in Tepotzotlán, Guanajuato, and in jungles near Acapulco and Parícutin, is one of the toughest. Tavernier considers Garden of Evil one of the finest westerns ever made. With a score by Bernard Herrmann. A 20th Century-Fox release.

Kiss of Death
Directed by Henry Hathaway
USA, 1947, 98m
Hathaway was one of the first Hollywood filmmakers to make a practice of shooting on location—his environments are always integral to the life of the story. This 1947 film, about a jewel thief (Victor Mature) targeted by the mob when he cooperates with the DA, was shot all over New York, from the criminal courts building on Centre Street to the Bronx, and became one of the most influential of the postwar docudramas. Hathaway wanted a local hood named Harry the Hat to play the psychopathic killer Tommy Udo, but he was forced to work with a newcomer named Richard Widmark. They clashed in the beginning, and then cooperated on a truly terrifying character creation. A 20th Century-Fox release.

Niagara
Directed by Henry Hathaway
USA, 1953, 98m
This 1953 suspense melodrama about matching crimes of passion, produced and co-written by Billy Wilder’s former partner Charles Brackett and shot in vibrant Technicolor, is set in the very particular world of honeymoon cottages on the Canadian side of Niagara Falls. Joseph Cotten is the brooding, damaged Korean war vet, and his young wife is played by Marilyn Monroe. “Zanuck was convinced Marilyn Monroe was a passing phenomenon,” said Hathaway of his lead actress, in the role that truly made her a star. “She didn’t know she was as good as she was.” A 20th Century-Fox release.

North to Alaska
Directed by Henry Hathaway
USA, 1960, 122m
Production on this big, boisterous entertainment package was hampered by wayward screenwriters, John Wayne going over schedule on The Alamo, a writers’ strike, and the replacement of original director Richard Fleischer with Hathaway. But the finished film, about a gold prospector (Wayne) who goes to Seattle to retrieve his partner’s fiancée and comes back to Nome with a good time saloon girl (Capucine), is so buoyant, funny, and perfectly keyed to its glorious natural settings that it all feels seamless. With Ernie Kovacs, Stewart Granger in one of his best performances as the partner, and, in the role that brought him the Harvard Lampoon’s coveted “Uncrossed Heart” award for Least Promising Actor, Fabian. A 20th Century-Fox release.

Rawhide
Directed by Henry Hathaway
USA, 1951, 89m
This tightly structured nail-biter, about the siege of a desert relay station by a group of escaped convicts, launched a long-running TV show with Clint Eastwood and set a template for the western suspense film for years to come, from High Noon through 3:10 to Yuma all the way up to last year’s The Hateful Eight. Tyrone Power is the boss’s son who is learning the ropes, Susan Hayward is the woman traveling with her niece, Hugh Marlowe is the leader of the gang, and his fellow convicts are played by Jack Elam, George Tobias, and the brilliant Dean Jagger. A 20th Century-Fox release.

The Shepherd of the Hills
Directed by Henry Hathaway
USA, 1941, 98m
This beautifully crafted Technicolor film, about two warring families in the Ozarks and the benign stranger who suddenly appears in their midst, crosses paths with John Ford (Hathaway’s friend) in its casting (John Wayne and Harry Carey are the stars, and Ward Bond and John Qualen play supporting roles), its rural setting, and its careful attention to community and the passage of time. Yet the film, the third adaptation of Harold Bell Wright’s once-renowned novel, has a very different kind of energy and a rich sense of the uncanny. Shepherd, which Hathaway was instructed to cut down for length, was his last film for Paramount. A Paramount Pictures release.

Spawn of the North
Directed by Henry Hathaway
USA, 1938, 110m
George Raft, Henry Fonda, and Dorothy Lamour star in this boisterous action film about rival fishing crews fighting for dominance of the Alaskan seas, with support from John Barrymore, Akim Tamiroff, and a wondrous mix of technical wizardry and stunning second-unit work (and some lovely Frank Loesser tunes as a bonus). If the story has something of the flavor of a Hawks film, that’s because the screenplay is co-written by Jules Furthman, but Hathaway looks at the friendships and rivalries and romantic entanglements of his characters from his own special angle: his maritime community is wild, loose, and free, no matter the consequences. A Paramount Pictures release.

FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER
The Film Society of Lincoln Center is devoted to supporting the art and elevating the craft of cinema. The only branch of the world-renowned arts complex Lincoln Center to shine a light on the everlasting yet evolving importance of the moving image, this nonprofit organization was founded in 1969 to celebrate American and international film. Via year-round programming and discussions; its annual New York Film Festival; and its publications, including Film Comment, the U.S.’s premier magazine about films and film culture, the Film Society endeavors to make the discussion and appreciation of cinema accessible to a broader audience, as well as to ensure that it will remain an essential art form for years to come.

The Film Society receives generous, year-round support from American Airlines, The New York Times, HBO, The Kobal Collection, Variety, Loews Regency Hotel, Row NYC Hotel, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the New York State Council on the Arts.

Support for the New York Film Festival is also generously provided by Jaeger-LeCoultre, the Mayor's Office of Media and Entertainment, and the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts.

For more information about the New York Film Festival, visit filmlinc.org/NYFF. For the latest news, subscribe to the festival’s newsletter, follow the festival on Facebook and Twitter, and use the hashtag: #NYFF.

August 17, 2016

NYFF 54 — PROJECTIONS: AVANT-GARDE SHOWCASE

NYFF54

THE FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER
ANNOUNCES THE LINEUP FOR ITS ANNUAL
AVANT-GARDE SHOWCASE, PROJECTIONS,
AT THE 54th NEW YORK FILM FESTIVAL

 

New York, NY (August 17, 2016) – The Film Society of Lincoln Center announces the complete lineup for the Projections section of the 54th New York Film Festival, to take place October 7-9. The slate is comprised of 11 programs presenting an international selection of film and video work that expands upon our notions of what the moving image can do and be. Drawing on a broad range of innovative modes and techniques, including experimental narratives, avant-garde poetics, crossovers into documentary and ethnographic realms, and contemporary art practices, Projections brings together a diverse offering of short, medium, and feature-length work by some of today’s most vital and groundbreaking visual artists.

“With the third edition of Projections, in the belief that artistic radicalism takes many forms, we're casting a wider net than ever,” said Dennis Lim, FSLC Director of Programming and one of the curators of Projections. “This is a section of the festival that we hope reflects the perennially fluid nature of experimental moving-image work, the fascinating and exhilarating ways in which visionary artists are always reinventing the medium to both mirror and shape the historical moment. This may be our most eclectic and energizing lineup yet, juxtaposing major figures of the avant-garde with promising up-and-comers, ranging from abstract short work to feature-length semi-narratives, combining and straddling genres, registers, and generations.”

This year’s lineup features 44 films in 11 programs with 10 world premieres, five North American premieres, and 13 U.S. premieres. Among the highlights are Eduardo Williams’s The Human Surge, winner of the top prize in Locarno’s 2016 Filmmakers of the Present section; world premieres of new work by visual poets Nathaniel Dorsky and Jerome Hiler, the subjects of last year’s NYFF Retrospective; features including Deborah Stratman’s The Illinois Parables and Dane Komljen’s All the Cities of the North; and the U.S. premiere of Há Terra!, directed by 2015 Kazuko Trust Award winner Ana Vaz. This year’s recipient of the Kazuko Award, which recognizes artistic excellence and innovation and is awarded to an emerging filmmaker in the Projections lineup, will be announced in September.

Twenty works will screen on celluloid (15 on 16mm and five on 35mm), including several of this year’s repertory selections: restorations of avant-garde luminary Robert Beavers’s From the Notebook of… (1971/1998) and three historical films by legendary Canadian filmmaker David Rimmer, preserved by the Academy Film Archive, as well as a tribute to the late Peter Hutton with a screening of his In Titan’s Goblet. Projections also features premieres from returning filmmakers Luke Fowler (For Christian), Janie Geiser (Flowers of the Sky), John Smith (Steve Hates Fish), Jesse McLean (See a Dog, Hear a Dog), Kevin Jerome Everson (Ears, Nose and Throat), Tomonari Nishikawa (Ten Mornings Ten Evenings and One Horizon), and many more; the NYFF debuts of acclaimed visual artists Mark Leckey (Dream English Kid, 1964–1999 AD), Rosalind Nashashibi (Electrical Gaza), Steve Reinke (A Boy Needs a Friend), Lawrence Lek (Europa, Mon Amour), Clemens von Wedemeyer (The Horses of a Cavalry Captain), Rosa Barba (Bending to Earth), and Stephen Sutcliffe (Twixt Cup and Lip); and a few Film Society of Lincoln Center alums new to Projections—James N. Kienitz Wilkins (Indefinite Pitch), who was in last year’s NYFF New York shorts program, and filmmakers Komljen and Williams, whose work has screened in the Film Society’s Art of the Real festival.

This year, the NYFF is proud to continue its collaboration with the curated video-on-demand service MUBI, a platform that showcases the best international, classic, and award-winning films from around the globe. MUBI will be a dedicated sponsor of the Projections section for the second consecutive year. Several titles from past Projections lineups will be made available on MUBI leading up to the festival, and a selection from the 2016 program will be featured upon completion of the festival. Details on the films and schedule will be announced at a later date.

Projections is curated by Dennis Lim (FSLC Director of Programming) and Aily Nash (independent curator). Thomas Beard (FSLC Programmer at Large) serves as Program Advisor. The curators wish to thank Colin Beckett, Shelby Shaw, Edo Choi, Maxwell Paparella, Mark Toscano, Gonzalo de Pedro Amatria, and the Andy Warhol Foundation.

Projections tickets are $15 for General Public and $10 for Members & Students. A $99 Projections All Access Pass will also be available for purchase. Visit filmlinc.org/NYFF for more information.

Tickets for the 54th New York Film Festival will go on sale September 11. Becoming a Film Society Member at the Film Buff Level or above provides early ticket access to festival screenings and events ahead of the general public, along with the exclusive member ticket discount. Learn more at filmlinc.org/membership.

For even more access, VIP passes and subscription packages offer the earliest opportunities to purchase tickets and secure seats at some of the festival's biggest events including Opening and Closing Nights, and Centerpiece. VIP passes also provide access to many exciting events, including the invitation-only Opening Night party, “An Evening With…” dinner, Filmmaker Brunch, and VIP Lounge. Benefits vary based on the pass or package type purchased. VIP passes and subscription packages are on sale now. Learn more at filmlinc.org/NYFF.

FILMS & DESCRIPTIONS
All films screen digitally at the Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center (144 W. 65th St.) unless otherwise noted.

Program 1: THE SPACES BETWEEN THE WORDS
Friday, October 7, 4:00pm
Saturday, October 8, 3:00pm
TRT: 81m

REGAL
Karissa Hahn, USA, 2015, 16mm, 2m
An old Regal Cinemas pre-show animation is further degraded as it’s run through a ringer of format transfers, each layer representing a different viewing space.

Steve Hates Fish
John Smith, UK, 2015, 5m
Recorded from a smartphone screen, its translation app running on the wrong settings and struggling to interpret North London street signs in French and convert them to English, Steve Hates Fish turns errors into unintentional poetry.

Real Italian Pizza
David Rimmer, Canada, 1971, 16mm, 13m
Scenes outside a Manhattan pizza joint, shot over eight months from a fourth-floor apartment window. Men stand eating their slices and drinking their sodas alone; groups of friends and neighborhood acquaintances, mostly black, hang out, talking and laughing; a few cops, all white, march a man away in handcuffs; summer turns to winter. Preserved by the Academy Film Archive.

Now: End of Season
Ayman Nahle, Lebanon, 2015, 20m
U.S. Premiere
In the cosmopolitan Turkish city of Izmir, thousands of Syrians fleeing Assad, ISIS, and the proxy forces lined up behind them, bide their time, waiting to cross the Aegean Sea. On the soundtrack, voices from a previous war.

See a Dog, Hear a Dog
Jesse McLean, USA, 2016, 18m
World Premiere
This tragicomic analysis of communication between humans, animals, and machines was made with original video footage, computer animations, and internet media, including YouTube dog videos, chatbot dialogue windows, and images from iTunes visualizer.

Twixt Cup and Lip
Stephen Sutcliffe, UK, 2016, 23m
World Premiere
This sound and video collage, produced in conjunction with a museum exhibit about Yorkshire playwright and novelist David Storey, draws from BBC outtakes, Edwardian-nostalgic commercial design, and other sources of mid-century British middlebrow to consider the vagaries of class mobility.

Program 2: BEYOND LANDSCAPE
Friday, October 7, 6:30pm
Saturday, October 8, 5:15pm
TRT: 78m

Burning Mountains That Spew Flame / Montañas Ardientes Que Vomitan Fuego
Helena Girón and Samuel Delgado, Spain, 2016, 14m
U.S. Premiere
Scientific claims made by 17th-century Jesuit polymath Athanasius Kircher and political ones made by the Invisible Committee are examined in this journey into the volcanoes of Lanzarote.

Bending to Earth
Rosa Barba, USA/Germany, 2015, 35mm, 15m
Helicopter shots circle variously colored shapes carved into desert landscapes. We discover these manmade inscriptions are storage cells for radioactive material designed to eventually return to the soil.

Ten Mornings Ten Evenings and One Horizon
Tomonari Nishikawa, Japan, 2016, 16mm, 10m
U.S. Premiere
Delivering exactly what his title promises—but not necessarily in the order you’d expect—Nishikawa presents 20 sequences shot along Japan’s Yahagi River; images tautly suspended between stillness and movement, darkness and light.

Canadian Pacific I
David Rimmer, Canada, 1974, 16mm, 9m
Scenes taken from a single, second-floor view of Vancouver Harbor, recorded over three winter months, pieced together with subtle dissolves so as to resemble one ten-minute shot. “Its formalism is very unimposing,” wrote Jonas Mekas, “like in a Hudson School painting.”  

Jáaji Approx.
Sky Hopinka, USA, 2015, 8m
Hopkina’s video address to his father is made of landscape images saturated with dark shadow and dreamy light, and features his father’s own words taken from recordings of Hočak language songs and chants.

Bad Mama, Who Cares
Brigid McCaffrey, USA, 2016, 35mm, 12m
World Premiere
Geologist Ren Lallatin inhabits different spaces—of brilliant snow and blazing sun, rundown towns and little-trodden deserts—in this structural-lyrical landscape film shot on richly tinted film.

Ears, Nose and Throat
Kevin Jerome Everson, USA, 2016, 10m
Everson returns to his hometown of Mansfield, Ohio, in this unblinking look at the simultaneity of the tragic and the mundane in black American life. The subject is the 2010 murder of 25-year-old DeCarrio Couley, who appeared in a number of Everson’s earlier films.

Program 3: THE ILLINOIS PARABLES
Friday, October 7, 8:45pm
TRT: 70m

The Illinois Parables
Deborah Stratman, USA, 2016, 16mm, 60m
Eleven episodes from the history of Illinois stand in for the United States at large. Working in her essayistic, political mode, Deborah Stratman synthesizes an array of materials into a rigorous yet playful consideration of the catastrophe of the state and the resilience of those who make up the nation.

Preceded by
The Horses of a Cavalry Captain / Die Pferde des Rittmeisters
Clemens von Wedemeyer, Germany, 2015, 10m
North American Premiere
During World War II, Wehrmacht captain Harald von Vietinghoff-Riesch traveled in advance of the army scouting for barracks. An amateur cinematographer, he also made 16mm images behind the front. Part of a larger project, Die pferde des Rittmeisters, made by Vietinghoff-Riesch’s grandson, presents footage of the cavalry horses, the artist’s commentary never letting us forget that these attractive creatures were also Nazi machines.

Program 4: FADE OUT
Saturday, October 8, 2:00pm
Saturday, October 8, 7:30pm
TRT: 76m

Old Hat
Zach Iannazzi, USA, 2016, 16mm, 8m
A scrapbook of 16mm images made on the fly, the length of each determined by the position of the Bolex spring when the shot begins. Some shove past as quickly as slides in a carousel advanced at top speed; others—etching the explosive ascent of fireworks in high-contrast white, or the arc of the setting sun on the mirrored glass of an office tower—linger.

Flowers of the Sky
Janie Geiser, USA, 2016, 9m
U.S. Premiere
Named after a medieval term for comets, Flowers of the Sky finds a seemingly infinite number of ways of looking at and into two mid-century postcards depicting the Freemasonic Order of the Eastern Star, using a macro lens and a variety of printing and masking techniques.

Answer Print
Mónica Savirón, USA, 2016, 16mm, 5m
World Premiere
Answer Print is assembled with pieces of deteriorating 16mm color stock. Not only the images themselves but also the world that produced them and which they reproduce—here suspended in the red aspic of faded color dye—threatens to disappear.

Athyrium filix-femina (for Anna Atkins)
Kelly Egan, Canada, 2016, 35mm, 5m
World Premiere
This homage to botanist and photography pioneer Anna Atkins was made in cyanotype photograms and reanimated film stills on stock exposed in the sun. Handcrafted with historically domestic, feminine tools, it’s structured as a narrative in quilting patterns.

Variations on a Cellophane Wrapper
David Rimmer, Canada, 1970, 16mm, 9m
This classic work of Canadian structural cinema consists of an eight-second shot of a woman in a factory unrolling a spool of cellophane in sheets, which crash like waves toward the camera. Rimmer loops the image, replaying it in segments that give it different visual and aural treatments. Preserved by the Academy Film Archive.

Ghost Children
Joao Vieira Torres, Brazil/France, 2016, 17m
North American Premiere
Ghost Children presents seven reminiscences of early childhood, read in seven different voices, as the camera presses close against the faded dye and exaggerated grain of family photographs from the early 1980s. The film encourages the audience to interrogate assumptions about gender, memory, performance, and death.

Cilaos
Camilo Restrepo, France, 2016, 13m
U.S. Premiere
A woman takes her mother’s dying wish to the father she never knew; he is dead but not gone from the Réunion Islands village of Cilaos, historically a Maroon community. With the collaboration of renowned singer Christine Salem, Restrepo develops a trans-diasporic narrative form built on the slave rhythms of Réunionese maloya and Colombian mapalé.
 
Luna e Santur
Joshua Gen Solondz, USA, 2016, 35mm, 11m
U.S. Premiere
Mingling sex and death with the supernatural and subnaturalistic, this visually assaultive threnody alternates white hot light with furious streaks of cruddy black goop, pushing the eye and the ego to their breaking points.

Program 5: SITE AND SOUND
Saturday, October 8, 4:15pm
Sunday, October 9, 12:30pm
TRT: 84m

Indefinite Pitch
James N. Kienitz Wilkins, USA, 2016, 23m
A procession of black and silvery white stills of New England’s Androscoggin River unspools alongside an anxious monologue on movies, memory, and minor history.

Europa, Mon Amour (2016 Brexit Edition)
Lawrence Lek, UK, 2016, 14m
North American Premiere
This guided, two-part meditation on Brexit unfolds in a computer-simulated hallucination of the London district of Dalston, a place with no people but filled with drones and fires.

Strange Vision of Seeing Things
Ryan Ferko, Canada/Serbia, 2016, 14m
U.S. Premiere
Time-spaces of post-Yugoslav Serbia: the empty lobby of a defunct industrial conglomerate’s headquarters in Belgrade; an unseen man describing tripping on acid during the 1999 NATO bombings; a mother and her young son visit ruins left by that same campaign. At first they appear in crisp HD, but cracks form, revealing dimensions beneath the smooth surface.

Foyer
Ismaïl Bahri, France/Tunisia, 2016, 32m
U.S. Premiere
A white haze flutters on-screen, accompanied by street sounds in Tunis. Indistinct shapes appear as passersby engage the cameraman about his project and their lives. He tells one of them, “The wind does the editing.”

Program 6: ALL THE CITIES OF THE NORTH
Saturday, October 8, 6:45pm

All the Cities of the North / Svi severni gradovi
Dane Komljen, Serbia/Bosnia-Herzegovina/Montenegro, 2016, 100m
North American Premiere
In the darkly wooded grounds and concrete boxes of what was once a Yugoslav resort complex, two men share an enigmatic, tender life. A stranger comes to town; things change, but how, what, and why remain ambiguous. In Komljen’s richly suggestive, quietly moving elegy to lost utopias, no words are exchanged, and speech only comes in monologues, taking up questions on the architecture and administration of human sociality. 

Program 7: POP CULTURE CLASH
Saturday, October 8, 9:30pm
Sunday, October 9, 3:00pm
TRT: 63m

A Boy Needs a Friend
Steve Reinke, USA, 2015, 22m
This latest installment of Final Thoughts, the series of unreliably narrated queer video essays that Reinke intends to continue until his death, takes love and friendship as its main subjects. Onto this he latches a long chain of endless digressions, which include, among much else, Stephen King and Joyce Carol Oates, the pleasures of needlepoint, and the design of an anal tattoo.

Spotlight on a Brick Wall
Alee Peoples and Mike Stoltz, USA, 2016, 16mm, 8m
An abstracted nightclub performance, its constituent parts—stand-up comedy, a capella, a laconic bass-and-drum rock duo, a slapstick mime—wrenched apart and recombined.

Return to Forms
Zachary Epcar, USA, 2016, 10m
World Premiere
The surfaces and shapes of typical international contempo yuppie style are defamiliarized, staged in and around a condo in an unnamed urban environment.

Dream English Kid, 1964–1999 AD
Mark Leckey, UK, 2015, 16mm, 23m
North American Premiere
Dream English Kid traces the cultural developments in the life of a working-class English boy, between the start of the Nuclear Test Ban and Azzido Da Bass’s first EP, as a collage of images and sounds, locating the broadly shared within the idiosyncratic and personal.

Program 8: DORSKY AND HILER
Sunday, October 9, 1:00pm
Sunday, October 9, 5:00pm
TRT: 65m

Autumn
Nathaniel Dorsky, USA, 2016, 16mm, 26m
World Premiere
“Autumn, photographed during the last months of the drought year, 2015, is a stately, but intimate, seasonal tome, a celebration of the poignancy and mystery of our later years.” —Nathaniel Dorsky

The Dreamer
Nathaniel Dorsky, USA, 2016, 16mm, 19m
World Premiere
“This year our midsummer’s night was adorned with a glorious full moon. The weeks and days preceding the solstice were magically alive with crisp, cool breezes, bright warm sunlight, and a general sense of heartbreaking clarity. The Dreamer is born out of this most poignant San Francisco spring.” —Nathaniel Dorsky

Bagatelle II
Jerome Hiler, USA, 2016, 16mm, 20m
World Premiere
“With Bagatelle II, I seem to have come full circle by returning to the so-called polyvalent style of my earliest film endeavors from 50 years ago. The film actually includes material from all the intervening decades. It's both up to the moment yet life-spanning, with a thread of deep affection for the special characteristics of 16mm film.” —Jerome Hiler

Program 9: EVENT HORIZONS
Sunday, October 9, 3:15pm
Sunday, October 9, 7:00pm
TRT: 81m

Há Terra!
Ana Vaz, Brazil/France, 2016, 13m
U.S. Premiere
The camera jerks quickly across a field in the Brazilian Sertão, homing in on a young Maroon woman crouching in the tall grass. A hand feels around in the brush, caressing the earth. From these two images, Ana Vaz’s film proceeds on tracks that neither fully merge nor completely diverge, expressing the incommensurability of filmmaker and subject.

Kindah
Ephraim Asili, USA/Jamaica, 2016, 12m
World Premiere
Shot between the Maroon village of Accompong, Jamaica, and Hudson, New York, the alternately sparse and exultantly polyrhythmicKindah is part of a series of films examining the filmmaker's relationship to the African diaspora. The title alludes to the mango tree that symbolizes common kinship in the Jamaican Maroon culture.

In Titan’s Goblet
Peter Hutton, USA, 1991, 16mm, 9m
Titled after a painting by Thomas Cole, this work of Hudson River School landscape filmmaking by the late Peter Hutton is a study of ships and smoke on the water.

An Aviation Field / Um Campo de Aviação
Joana Pimenta, Portugal/USA/Brazil, 2016, 13m
U.S. Premiere
Using warm, darkly saturated 16mm images shot on the volcanic island of Fogo, Cape Verde, and in modernist Brasilia, and sounds that range between trebly crackle and aquatic gurgle, Pimenta constructs a surreal and mythical landscape from the remnants of Portuguese colonialism.

Electrical Gaza
Rosalind Nashashibi, UK, 2015, 18m
Commissioned by London’s Imperial War Museum, Electrical Gaza combines vérité documentary scenes of public life in Gaza shot by Nashashibi in 2014, portraits of her crew, and uncanny, painterly computer animations modeled from the footage, rendering it unreal—as the Israeli government would claim and Palestinians would like to make it. 

Event Horizon
Guillermo Moncayo, France, 2015, 16m
A story modeled on 19th-century ethnography and colonialist travel literature unfolds in titles written in a mythological register. Lush images and sounds accrue a level of detail that refuses knowledge and courts being.

Program 10: FROM THE NOTEBOOK OF . . .
Sunday, October 9, 5:30pm
TRT: 55m

From the Notebook of…
Robert Beavers, Italy/Switzerland, 1971/1998, 35mm, 48m
North American Restoration Premiere
An essential film by one of cinema’s living masters, forged from the brilliant light of Florence streets and the shadow of an oldpensionne, this astounding work of public science and private experience was inspired by Leonardo Da Vinci’s notebooks. According to P. Adams Sitney, this is “the first film of [Beavers’] artistic maturity.”

Preceded by
For Christian
Luke Fowler, UK/USA, 2016, 16mm, 7m
Fowler’s portrait of New York School composer Christian Wolff continues his investigation into the legacies of 20th-century avant-garde music. Short, handheld shots taken at Wolff’s New Hampshire farm are assembled in diagonal relation to a soundtrack that features snippets of conversation with Wolff and passages from his compositions.

Program 11: THE HUMAN SURGE
Sunday, October 9, 7:30pm
TRT: 97m

The Human Surge / El auge del humano
Eduardo Williams, Argentina/Brazil/Portugal, 2016, 97m
U.S. Premiere
A twenty-something in Argentina loses his warehouse job. Boys in Maputo, Mozambique, perform half-hearted sex acts in front of a webcam. A woman in the Philippines assembles electronics in a small factory. Williams’s inquisitive camera is in constant motion, as are his rootless characters, who wander aimlessly, make small talk, futz with their phones, and search for a working Internet connection. Unfolding within the unfree time between casual jobs, this wildly original rumination on labor and leisure in the global digital economy seems to take place in both the immediate present and the far horizon of the foreseeable future. Winner of the top prize in the 2016 Locarno Film Festival’s Filmmakers of the Present section.

FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER
The Film Society of Lincoln Center is devoted to supporting the art and elevating the craft of cinema. The only branch of the world-renowned arts complex Lincoln Center to shine a light on the everlasting yet evolving importance of the moving image, this nonprofit organization was founded in 1969 to celebrate American and international film. Via year-round programming and discussions; its annual New York Film Festival; and its publications, including Film Comment, the U.S.’s premier magazine about films and film culture, the Film Society endeavors to make the discussion and appreciation of cinema accessible to a broader audience, as well as to ensure that it will remain an essential art form for years to come.

The Film Society receives generous, year-round support from American Airlines, The New York Times, HBO, The Kobal Collection, Variety, Loews Regency Hotel, Row NYC Hotel, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the New York State Council on the Arts.

Support for the New York Film Festival is also generously provided by Jaeger-LeCoultre, the Mayor's Office of Media and Entertainment, and the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts.

For more information about the New York Film Festival, visit filmlinc.org/NYFF. For the latest news, subscribe to the festival’s newsletter, follow the festival on Facebook and Twitter, and use the hashtag: #NYFF.

LEFT COAST BY TED RALL

August 16, 2016

ERIC ROHMER’S MORAL TALES — SEPTEMBER 16-29

 

THE FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER ANNOUNCES ERIC ROHMER’S MORAL TALES, SEPTEMBER 16-29

All new restorations, highlighted by weeklong theatrical runs of La collectionneuse and Love in the Afternoon

 

Love in the Afternoon

New York, NY (August 10, 2016) – The Film Society of Lincoln Center announces Eric Rohmer’s Moral Tales, September 16-29. FSLC will present all six Moral Tales in new 2K restorations, highlighted by two adjacent weeklong revivals of La collectionneuse and Love in the Afternoon.

“His works all end decisively with some new insight, for those of us forever under his spell, to savor.” —Andrew Sarris

In 1950, the French publisher Gallimard rejected a manuscript of a short story collection called Moral Tales, submitted by a thirty-year-old Eric Rohmer. In the early sixties, by then an influential critic and a late-flowering movie director, he resolved to adapt the stories for the screen, each inspired by F. W. Murnau's Sunrise, in which a man, committed to one woman, is tempted by another. The resulting series, which took a decade to complete, established Rohmer’s international filmmaking reputation. Thrillingly intelligent portraits of self-centered, articulate, often foolish men and the women they belittle, idolize, stalk, and long for, staged with offhand visual imagination and full of electrifying, high-stakes verbal showdowns, the six Moral Tales represented an entirely new way of handling male-female relationships on screen.

None of the tales are chiding or moralizing (“It would be nonsense to believe that I am proposing a moral of some kind,” Rohmer once said of them), but they all show a distinctive willingness to expose their characters’ insecurities and pretentions—to put their male heroes through punishing educations. Taken together, these films are a kind of proving ground for Rohmer and his collaborators, including the producer Barbet Schroeder, the cinematographer Néstor Almendros, and the many vital, intellectually driven actors who found in them the space to develop new ways of playing out their characters’ debates and indecisions.

The Moral Tales still remain the films most associated with Rohmer, and most representative of his many contradictory traits as a filmmaker: strict and yet playful, conservative and sensual, reticent but always ready to judge.

Tickets will go on sale Thursday, September 1st and are $14; $11 for students and seniors (62+); and $9 for Film Society members. See more and save with the 3+ film discount package. Visit filmlinc.org for more information.

Organized by Florence Almozini

Acknowledgments:
Les Films du Losange; Janus Films

Claire’s Knee / Le genou de Claire
Eric Rohmer, France, 1970, 106m
French with English subtitles
There’s nothing in Rohmer’s body of work quite like the conversations that take place throughout this lakeside morality play between Jerome, an engaged diplomat, and his confidante, an ironic, rueful novelist played by Rohmer’s own close friend Aurora Cornu. Their debates center on Jerome’s infatuation with the two teenagers he finds himself living near while his fiancée travels abroad. Laura is fiercely intelligent, friendly, outgoing, and unwilling to be used. It’s her quieter, more sullen sister, Claire, however, whom he eventually gravitates toward with predatory interest. (On the film’s release, one reviewer compared him to a fairy tale wolf.) The two older characters spend much of the movie picking apart Jerome’s sinister motives, providing an unpredictable, running critical commentary on the rest of the movie’s action. Among Rohmer’s most iconic movies, Claire’s Knee is also one of his most troubling and ambiguous—in which it’s tantalizingly hard to tell where the director’s sympathies lie.
Saturday, September 17, 8:45pm
Sunday, September 18, 4:30pm
Saturday, September 24, 4:30pm
Sunday, September 25, 8:45pm

La collectionneuse
Eric Rohmer, France, 1967, 87m
English and French with English subtitles
The Moral Tales are populated by vain, insecure men who insist on finding moral justifications for self-centered behavior. But none of Rohmer’s male characters fit that description better than the two bohemians—an art dealer and an experimental painter—who retreat to a Riviera summer house for a quiet getaway and find themselves sharing the space with a sexually threatening young woman in this cunning, bitter psychological study. Rohmer and cinematographer Néstor Almendros shot La collectionneuse quickly and cheaply, on color 35mm, with an array of mirrors and other devices to exploit their setting’s rich natural light. The resulting film’s cheery palette, full of seductive golden tints and deep nocturnal blues, underlines how thrillingly and ruthlessly Rohmer excoriates his heroes. This was a turning point for the director and the series.
Friday, September 16, 2:30pm, 4:30pm, 6:45pm & 8:45pm
Saturday, September 17, 2:30pm & 6:45pm
Sunday, September 18, 6:45pm
Monday, September 19 - Thursday, September 22, 6:45pm & 8:45pm

Love in the Afternoon / L'amour l'après-midi
Eric Rohmer, France, 1972, 93m
French with English subtitles      
The last of the Moral Tales ends the series with a burst of new, disruptive elements: interludes of experimental electronic music; fantasy and dream sequences; risqué sex scenes; a married male protagonist who works in an office! Rather than a left-field departure, however, the film is a grand summation of the Moral Tales’ preoccupations and themes. Happily married with a young child, Frédéric finds his comfortable life upset when he re-encounters old flame Chloe, a confident, rootless, glamorous woman who teases him for having become so bourgeois. As Rohmer’s recent biographers Antoine de Baecque and Noël Herpe have put it, if the previous Moral Tales centered on men who have to choose between two women, Love in the Afternoon is “a utopia of doubling”—a dream of committing fully to two mutually exclusive courses of action. “You’ve never dreamed of living two lives at the same time, simultaneously but in a complete and perfect way?” Frédéric asks Chloe. “That’s impossible,” she tells him. “It’s a dream.” Few of Rohmer’s films critique that dream with such moving urgency.
Friday, September 23, 4:30pm, 6:45pm & 8:45pm
Saturday, September 24, 6:45pm & 8:45pm
Sunday, September 25, 2:30pm & 6:45pm
Monday, September 26 - Thursday, September 29, 6:45pm & 8:45pm

My Night at Maud’s / Ma nuit chez Maud
Eric Rohmer, France, 1969, 111m
French with English subtitles
Rohmer had always conceived of this story—of a Catholic mathematician torn between indulgence and asceticism—as the third installment in the Moral Tales, but he shot it fourth, having taken years to extract commitments from his wary producers and from his reluctant star, Jean-Louis Trintignant. No other actor, Rohmer insisted, could capture the agony this character goes through, having to choose between the prim churchgoer he hopes to marry and the confident divorcée at whose house he ends up sleeping during a snowy Christmas Eve. Indeed, it’s hard to imagine anyone else conveying that combination of intelligence and boyish idealism, stooped reticence and contained lust, as well as Trintignant. And while Rohmer’s financiers balked at the prospect of a black-and-white film stocked with long conversations about free will and Pascal, My Night at Maud’s became one of Rohmer’s biggest popular and critical successes—a luminous, sexy, unerringly intelligent treatment of romantic and religious indecision.
Saturday, September 17, 4:30pm
Sunday, September 18, 8:45pm
Sunday, September 25, 4:30pm

Suzanne’s Career / La carrière de Suzanne                 
Eric Rohmer, France, 1963, 55m
French with English subtitles
“Eighteen is an age without excuses,” began the 1949 short story Rohmer later revised as the treatment for the second of the Moral Tales. Rohmer made few excuses for the two college-age men at the story’s center, who spurn what they call the “career” of an outgoing young woman they both pursue. In Suzanne’s Career, Rohmer and his collaborators—a team of friends and fellow cinephiles that again included Barbet Schroeder—developed a handful of devices that recurred throughout the later Tales: causal medium-to-long takes, a modest battery of well-used locations, and extended dialogue scenes that pay close attention to how these people, with all their pretentions and prejudices, would actually talk. Suzanne’s Career now seems like both a revealing predecessor to La collectionneuse and a trenchant, observant drama all its own.

Screening with:
The Bakery Girl of Monceau / La boulangère de Monceau
Eric Rohmer, France, 1963, 23m
French with English subtitles
The first of Rohmer’s Moral Tales—and the only one not adapted from a short story he’d written long before—is an effervescent and subtly cutting portrait of a young man (played by Rohmer’s longtime associate Barbet Schroeder) whose romantic interest swings between a well-to-do student and the bakery girl he casually courts when he loses track of his real object of affection. Nimble and acute, The Bakery Girl of Monceau is the closest Rohmer ever came to working in the pioneering style of his younger New Wave colleagues and a clear incubator for the ideas he’d explore in the rest of the series.
Sunday, September 18, 2:30pm
Saturday, September 24, 2:30pm

FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER
The Film Society of Lincoln Center is devoted to supporting the art and elevating the craft of cinema. The only branch of the world-renowned arts complex Lincoln Center to shine a light on the everlasting yet evolving importance of the moving image, this nonprofit organization was founded in 1969 to celebrate American and international film. Via year-round programming and discussions; its annual New York Film Festival; and its publications, including Film Comment, the U.S.’s premier magazine about films and film culture, the Film Society endeavors to make the discussion and appreciation of cinema accessible to a broader audience, as well as to ensure that it will remain an essential art form for years to come.

The Film Society receives generous, year-round support from American Airlines, The New York Times, HBO, The Kobal Collection, Variety, Loews Regency Hotel, Row NYC Hotel, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the New York State Council on the Arts.

For more information, visit www.filmlinc.org and follow @filmlinc on Twitter.

 

August 15, 2016

NYFF 54: CONVERGENCE SECTION LINE-UP

NYFF54

THE FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER
ANNOUNCES THE LINEUP FOR CONVERGENCE
AT THE 54th NEW YORK FILM FESTIVAL

Nine new works include: two World Premieres, audience-directed narrative films, large-scale installations, virtual and augmented reality projects, and more immersive storytelling innovations

Plus: talks featuring ILMxLAB’s Hilmar Koch & Nick Rasmussen, StoryCode’s Mike Knowlton, producer Lindsay Doran on the psychology of storytelling, and sneak peek of anticipated project Traveling While Black

New York, NY (August 15, 2016) – The Film Society of Lincoln Center announces the complete details for the Convergence section of the 54th New York Film Festival, which will take place October 1–4. The fifth edition of the highly anticipated annual program delves into the world of immersive storytelling via nine interactive experiences, featuring virtual reality, augmented reality, installations, and more—including two World Premieres and one U.S. Premiere.

"The art of immersive storytelling is continually evolving," said NYFF Convergence programmer Matt Bolish. "Our mission has been consistent from our first year to this, our fifth: bringing the best survey of interactive work to the NYFF audience. The core of the program remains an exciting slate of participatory pieces augmented by talks on a wide range of topics related to immersive and interactive art."

Over the course of the weekend, audiences can explore a multitude of non-traditional film experiences, including immersive storytelling experiences Sound Hunters, where users record the sounds of their world via an app, mixing and remixing their own electronic music compositions; thrilling audience-directed heist film Late Shift in its U.S. premiere; and, back by popular demand for a second year, the hyper-collaborative Sherlock Holmes & The Internet of Things, in which participants assume the role of the famed detective to solve mysterious crimes across Lincoln Center.

Virtual reality highlights are the World Premiere of acclaimed Indian work Priya’s Mirror, which fuses comic books and augmented reality to shatter taboos around the subject of violence against women; Giant, which transports the viewer into a family’s bomb shelter in an active war zone; Ricerca VR, which incorporates 2D and stop-motion artistry to create a visually stunning world; and Cardboard City, where participants become artists by adding buildings, memories, and stories to an ever-evolving cityscape. Also featured are two interactive video installations: EKO, a trio of interactive shorts that masterfully balance technical achievement and quality storytelling, and the World Premiere of large-scale Lives in Transit, which chronicles 24 hours in the lives of 10 transportation workers across the globe, and which will run fromOctober 1-16.

Complementing these nine experiential works are various talks and panels. Presentations include ILMxLAB visionaries Hilmar Koch and Nick Rasmussen on collaborative innovations in immersive entertainment; Positive Psychology expert Lindsay Doran on the psychology of storytelling; The State of the (Interactive) Art, a panel for StoryCode’s fifth anniversary, with cofounder Mike Knowlton and special guests; and a special preview event for the much-anticipated project Traveling While Black, highlighted by a sneak peek at its first VR piece and a panel discussion with Academy Award-winning director Roger Ross Williams.

The complete schedule will be announced at a later date. Convergence experiences and installations are free and open to the public. Special Talks are $15; $10 for Film Society Members and Students. See more and save with a 3+ ticket discount package. Learn more at filmlinc.org/NYFF.

NYFF filmmaker conversations and panels, including a series of “Meet the Makers” conversations with featured Convergence storytellers, will be announced in the coming weeks, as well as more festival sections: Special Events, Spotlight on Documentary, Retrospective, and Projections. As previously announced, the festival Main Slate boasts three World Premieres in the gala slots: Ava DuVernay’s The 13th (Opening Night), Mike Mills’s 20th Century Women(Centerpiece), and James Gray’s The Lost City of Z (Closing Night). The complete lineup can be found here.

The 17-day New York Film Festival highlights the best in world cinema, featuring works from celebrated filmmakers as well as fresh new talent. The selection committee, chaired by Jones, also includes Dennis Lim, FSLC Director of Programming; Florence Almozini, FSLC Associate Director of Programming; Amy Taubin, Contributing Editor, Artforumand Film Comment; and Gavin Smith, who serves as a consultant.

Tickets for the 54th New York Film Festival will go on sale September 11. Becoming a Film Society Member at the Film Buff Level or above provides early ticket access to festival screenings and events ahead of the general public, along with the exclusive member ticket discount. Learn more at filmlinc.org/membership.

For even more access, VIP passes and subscription packages offer the earliest opportunities to purchase tickets and secure seats at some of the festival’s biggest events including Opening and Closing Nights, and Centerpiece. VIP passes also provide access to many exciting events, including the invitation-only Opening Night party, “An Evening With…” dinners, Filmmaker Brunch, and VIP Lounge. Benefits vary based on the pass or package type purchased. VIP passes and subscription packages are on sale now. Learn more at filmlinc.org/NYFF.

 

NYFF54 CONVERGENCE EVENTS AND DESCRIPTIONS

Experiences and Installations

Cardboard City
Kiira Benzing, Stina Hamlin
Virtual Reality & Augmented Reality, 2016, USA, 3m
Cities are in a constant state of flux, waxing and waning along with their populations. Many consider these cycles of growth and decline part of the appeal of urban living, but change has consequences for those not able to keep up. Such is the case with the subjects of Cardboard City, a community of artists forced out of their Gowanus studios due to skyrocketing rents and runaway development. Blending virtual reality, augmented reality, and user-generated content, the piece is a hands-on interactive installation that uses these artists’ stories as a jumping-off point, before inviting viewers to become creators and add buildings, memories, and stories to an ever evolving cityscape.
Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, October 1 & 2

EKO
Interlude, Sandeep Parikh, Casey Donahue, Daniel Scheinert, Billy Chew
Interactive Video Installation, 2016, USA
Interactive video projects often weigh mechanics against storytelling, creating an unbalanced final product: it’s a technical achievement or a quality story, but rarely both. EKO, a new video platform that responds to the viewer’s input, may finally have balanced the scales. Audiences are invited to experience a trio of interactive shorts built on this new platform: The Gleam, an interactive documentary about a small town paper; That Moment When, a comedy that asks the viewer to navigate a battery of awkward conversations; and Now/Then, a Rashomon-inspired story focused on the various perspectives swirling around a relationship on the rocks.
Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, October 1 & 2

Giant
Milica Zec, Winslow Turner Porter III
Virtual Reality, 2016, USA, 10m
Virtual reality has been so central to recent discussions of interactive storytelling that it’s easy to forget that the form is still relatively new. With the ability to drop the viewer into an immersive environment, it’s no wonder that early conversations about VR stories focus on the empathy between audiences and subjects. This is used to startling effect in Giant. Transported to a basement shelter in an active war zone, we watch—and listen—as parents try to distract their daughter from the thunder of bombs. This is more than a film rendered in 360 degrees; it’s a testament to the power of this nascent form of storytelling.
Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, October 1 & 2

Late Shift
Baptiste Planche, Tobias Weber
Audience-Directed Narrative Feature, 2016, Switzerland, 80m
Are games and films on a collision course? It’s a question asked every time emergent technologies broaden what’s possible with a little code, a story, and the will to blend the two. Yet while cinematic games are commonplace, game-like films are not. The high-octane thriller Late Shift aims to change that. A parking attendant’s world is turned upside down when he’s forced to take part in a brazen heist, and the audience makes choices to shape the story via an app. The branching narrative is flawlessly executed, creating an in-theater experience as enjoyable for the casual viewer as the hardcore “player.” U.S. Premiere
Howard Gilman Theater, Sunday October 2, 5:30pm

Lives in Transit
Global Lives Project
Video Installation, 2015/2016, USA
The San Francisco–based Global Lives Project produces long-form documentaries that capture the rich diversity of human experience and engender cross-cultural dialogue and understanding.  Each 24-hour film provides a window onto a single day in the life of its subject. This latest iteration of the project, Lives in Transit, focuses on ten individuals who in their own ways are responsible for moving people and products throughout the world. Presented as a large-scale video installation, Lives in Transit is more than an exploration of ten unique people—it is a dynamic ground-level examination of our hyper-connected world. World Premiere
Walter Reade Theater’s Furman Gallery, October 1-16

Priya’s Mirror
Ram Devineni, Dan Goldman, Paromita Vohra, Shubra Prakash, Vikas Menon
Augmented Reality Installation, 2016, USA/India
Launched in 2014, Priya’s Shakti was a first-of-its-kind fusion of augmented reality, comic books, and social engagement. The story of Priya, a rape survivor and modern-day superhero, shattered taboos that exist in India on the subject of violence against women. The second volume of this ongoing series, Priya’s Mirror sees the heroine joining forces with acid attack survivors to take on the demon king Ahankar. As with its predecessor, Priya’s Mirror makes use of augmented reality to bring the 2D world of the comic to vivid life and unlock a number of interactive story elements. World Premiere
Walter Reade Theater’s Furman Gallery, October 1-16

Ricerca VR
Yo-Yo Lin, Will Cherry, Steve Dabal, Elle Callahan, Michael Matchen
Virtual Reality, 2016, USA, 15m
It’s no coincidence that we are so moved by stories about quests. The search—for love, for forgiveness, for meaning—is an essential aspect of our humanity. In Ricerca (Italian for “search”), a man scours his memories for something lost, traversing a lush world rendered with a vibrant mix of 2D and stop-motion animation. Originally presented as a large-scale video installation, the reimagined piece employs virtual reality to extend its life beyond the gallery space, raising a compelling question: what will the relationship be between VR and the world of fine art?
Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, October 1 & 2

Sherlock Holmes & The Internet of Things
Lance Weiler, Nick Fortugno
Immersive Storytelling Experience, 2016, USA
While one imagines that real criminal investigators hope for the shortest distance between crime and conviction, readers of detective fiction care more about the journey: the more twists the better. The same could be said for this ever-evolving storytelling experiment. Since its launch, participants from 20 countries have taken part in a project that uses the emergent web of connected digital devices to investigate mysteries with the world’s favorite consulting detective. For the second year, NYFF invites audiences to step into Holmes’s shoes to solve a string of crimes across Lincoln Center’s campus.
Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, October 1 (1:00pm, 2:30pm, 4:00pm)

Sound Hunters
François Le Gall, Nicolas Blies
Immersive Storytelling Experience, 2015, France
Long before Lawrence Lessig, Austin Kleon, and Malcolm Gladwell each dubbed this the Age of the Remix, T. S. Eliot wrote, “Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal.” With Sound Hunters, the audience makes music by recording and remixing the sounds of the world around them. Created by François Le Gall and Nicolas Blies, this multifaceted project does more than make music from the audio of everyday life; each uploaded sound is a window onto its author’s world, and every song created by the Sound Hunter community is as much a remix of distinctive life experiences as of unique audio elements.
Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, October 1 & 2

SPECIAL TALKS

ILMxLAB
Hilmar Koch and Nick Rasmussen, ILMxLAB
Founded in 2015, ILMxLAB fuses the talents of Lucasfilm, Industrial Light and Magic, and Skywalker Sound to create a new, collaborative space to experiment with stories across all visual media platforms—those we know well and those just being established. The lab encourages exploration, and, yes, even failure as a means for discovering new ways to tell and experience stories. Discovery is at the very heart of the lab’s work. Hilmar Koch and Nick Rasmussen will share some of their personal discoveries from their journey so far and reflect on the promise and perils of working at the frontiers of storytelling.
Saturday, October 1, 4:00pm

The Psychology of Storytelling: Lindsay Doran
Oscar-nominated producer and studio executive Lindsay Doran brings more than 30 years of experience in the movie business to bear on this examination of what the field of Positive Psychology can teach us about the secrets of writing a satisfying movie—and how our “deep-seated fear of the saber-tooth tiger” keeps them secret. Doran has served as the President of United Artists and as the President of Sydney Pollack’s Mirage Productions.  Doran’s first film credit was on the mockumentary This Is Spinal Tap. As a producer, her credits include Dead Again, Sense and Sensibility, Nanny McPhee, and Stranger Than Fiction.
Monday October 3, 2016, 6:30pm

The State of the (Interactive) Art
StoryCode’s Mike Knowlton, interactive theater director Michael Rau, filmmaker Ram Devineni, and more
The NYC Transmedia Meetup was founded as a monthly gathering of creative professionals looking to discuss the emerging field of multi-platform storytelling. By 2011, the group had evolved from a loose confederation of storytellers into a community that would become known as StoryCode. That same year, NYFF launched its Convergence section. On the fifth anniversary of both programs, StoryCode cofounder Mike Knowlton and a panel of key players from the New York interactive scene— Convergence veterans, game designers, immersive theater directors, virtual reality producers, and interactive filmmakers—reflect on where we’ve been and imagine where we’re headed.
Saturday October 1, 2:30pm

Traveling While Black: Special Preview Event
Roger Ross Williams, Bonnie Nelson Schwartz, Lina Srivastava, Yasmin Elayat 
Published in 1936, the Green Book became an essential tool for African American travelers. The book consisted of a coast-to-coast listing of bars, hotels, and other businesses that were black-friendly in the age of Jim Crow. Traveling While Black presents a contemporary exploration of the issues related to restricted movement in modern-day America with a suite of experiences including a traveling museum exhibit, virtual reality films, and live events. Academy Award–winning director Roger Ross Williams will present a sneak peek of this compelling project, including a live performance, a teaser of the project’s first VR piece, and a panel discussion. 
Tuesday, October 4, 6:30 pm

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