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April 11, 2018

71 FESTIVAL INTERNATIONAL DU FILM DE CANNES — POSTER

Cannes-film-festival-poster-2018

One of the many things I love about Cannes is the beautiful poster art the festival's artists consistently come up with. Ah yes, the romantic fantasy of Cinema. Is there anything finer?

April 05, 2018

Asghar Farhadi's EVERYBODY KNOWS will open 71st Festival de Cannes Competition

Everybody Knows

Everybody Knows © memento films

This year’s forthcoming Festival de Cannes will open with a screening of Asghar Farhadi's new film Everybody Knows (Todos Lo Saben) in Competition at the Grand Théâtre Lumière in the Palais des Festivals on Tuesday 8 May.

Asghar Farhadi's 8th feature film, shot entirely in Spanish on the Iberian Peninsula, charts the story of Laura, who lives with her husband and children in Buenos Aires. When they return together to her native village in Spain for a family celebration, an unexpected event changes the course of their lives. The family, its ties and the moral choices imposed on them lie, as in every one of Farhadi’s scripts, at the heart of the plot.

The last time the Opening Film was neither in English nor in French was for Pedro Almodóvar's Bad Education in 2004.
This psychological thriller stars Penélope Cruz and Javier Bardem from Spain and Ricardo Darín from Argentina. As usual, Asghar Farhadi also surrounds himself with a first-class team: José Luis Alcaine on photography (a regular collaborator of Pedro Almodóvar, Carlos Saura and Bigas Luna), the costume designer Sonia Grande (Midnight in Paris by Woody Allen, The Others by Alejandro Amenábar), and Iranian editor Hayedeh Safiyari, continuing a long and fruitful collaboration with the director after working together on four of his feature films, including his two Oscar-winning films.

Over the past decade, Asghar Farhadi has quickly established himself as one of Iran's most influential and internationally recognised filmmakers, both for his tense and carefully crafted scripts and for the virtuosity of his realism in directing. At the Berlinale, A Separation (2011) garnered the Golden Bear, as well as the Golden Globe, César and Oscar for Best Foreign Film. Farhadi then entered the Official Selection at Cannes with The Past (2013, Best Actress for Bérénice Bejo) and The Salesman (2016, Best Screenplay and Best Actor for Shahab Hosseini), which also won an Oscar for Best Foreign Film.

The Opening Ceremony to be held on May, 8th, will be broadcast free-to-air by Canal +, as well as in partner cinemas and followed by the preview screening of Everybody Knows in selected theatres in France.

Everybody Knows is produced by Memento Films Production (Alexandre Mallet-Guy) and Morena Films (Álvaro Longoria). The international sales are handled by Memento Films International and the French distribution by Memento Films. It will be released on Wednesday, May 9, in French cinemas.

The 71st Festival de Cannes will be held from Tuesday 8 to Saturday 19 May. The Competition Jury will be chaired by Cate Blanchett. The composition of the Official Selection will be announced on Thursday, April 12 and will be published live on our social media sites. Stay tuned!

Cinemafiles will note that this is the first time in a very long time that Cannes has not opened with a Hollywood film. Cannes is sending a long-overdue message that Hollywood is not at the top of international Cinema anymore. Hollywood is dead; long live Cinema.  

March 28, 2018

APRIL PROGRAMMING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK!

       
 
APRIL PROGRAMMING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK!
 
Includes Nicholas Ray's In A Lonely Place
Adventures in Moviegoing with Adam Gopnik, and five color films by Ozu!
 
Sunday, April 1
Adventures in Moviegoing with Megan AbbottIn a Lonely Place*

Cinema has been an important part of Megan Abbott's life since her days growing up in Grosse Pointe, Michigan, when her family would make trips to the local revival house. In her episode of Adventures in Moviegoing, the award-winning novelist spoke with programmer Michael Sragow about films she loves, including ones that have influenced her approach to crime fiction. This month, we're adding one of her all-time favorites to her personally curated series: Nicholas Ray's emotionally charged adaptation of the Dorothy B. Hughes thriller In a Lonely Place. A brilliant, turbulent mix of suspenseful noir and devastating melodrama, fueled by powerhouse performances from Humphrey Bogart and Gloria Grahame, the film follows a gifted but washed-up screenwriter who becomes the prime suspect in a Tinseltown murder. Watch it on the Channel with a new introduction by Abbott.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Tuesday, April 3
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Monkey Love Experiments* and Koko: A Talking Gorilla

Two different takes on the complex relationship between humans and primates. Combining stop-motion animation, live-action, and CG, Will Anderson and Ainslie Henderson's BAFTA-nominated 2014 short Monkey Love Experiments tells the story of a misguided monkey who believes he's destined for the moon. In Koko: A Talking Gorilla, acclaimed director Barbet Schroeder and cinematographer Nestor Almendros create an intimate documentary portrait of the world-famous title subject, exploring the ethical concerns surrounding a controversial experiment that sought to teach her human communication through American Sign Language.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.

Wednesday, April 4
Metropolitan*: Edition #326
 
One of the great American independent films of the 1990s, the surprise hit Metropolitan, by writer-director Whit Stillman, is a sparkling comedic chronicle of a young man's romantic misadventures while trying to fit in to New York City's debutante society. Stillman's deft, literate dialogue and hilariously highbrow observations earned this first film an Academy Award nomination for best original screenplay. Beneath the wit and sophistication, though, lies a tender tale of adolescent anxiety. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: an audio commentary by Stillman, editor Christopher Tellefsen, and actors Chris Eigeman and Taylor Nichols; and rare outtakes and alternate casting, with commentary by Stillman.
 
Thursday, April 5
Art-House America: Gold Town Nickelodeon, Juneau, Alaska
Local Hero, Bill Forsyth, 1983
 
Last year, the Channel-exclusive series Art-House America took a trip to Juneau, Alaska, where intrepid programmer Colette Costa runs a downtown movie theater catering to year-round locals in the country's cruise-ship capital. Alongside our documentary portrait of this bustling venue, Costa has been programming an ongoing selection of films that capture "what it feels like to live in Alaska." The latest addition to the series is Bill Forsyth's 1983 Local Hero, presented in a limited engagement. Mixing wry comedy and unexpected pathos, and featuring music by Mark Knopfler, this stirring ode to Forsyth's native Scotland follows a Texas oil executive (Peter Riegert) whose life is changed when his boss (Burt Lancaster) sends him to a Scottish village to buy up land for a new refinery.
Friday, April 6
Friday Night Double Feature: Night Moves and My Night at Maud's
 
"I saw a Rohmer film once. It was kinda like watching paint dry." So says Gene Hackman, famously, in Arthur Penn's 1975 neo-noir Night Moves, a film that contains striking parallels and references to the French director's wonderfully talky 1969 My Night at Maud's. Penn's New Hollywood masterpiece centers on Harry Moseby (Hackman), a retired professional football player turned Los Angeles private investigator who finds himself embroiled in the complex case of a runaway teen. One of the most acclaimed entries in the influential series "Six Moral Tales," Rohmer's film features Jean-Louis Trintignant as a pious Catholic engineer whose rigid ethical standards are challenged when he unwittingly spends the night at the apartment of a bold, brunette divorcée.
 
Monday, April 9
Adventures in Moviegoing with Barry Jenkins: The Summer of Flying Fish*
 
Not long after winning an Oscar last year for Moonlight, Barry Jenkins joined Criterion's Peter Becker for an intimate conversation about his personal journey as a movie lover, the filmmakers who have influenced his style, and finding his relationship to cinema as a person of color. Alongside some of his favorite classics, he championed some little-seen gems, including Chilean director Marcela Said's 2013 narrative feature debut, The Summer of Flying Fish. A vivid coming-of-age story and a powerful allegory about environmental destruction, this richly atmospheric drama follows a teenage girl as she goes on vacation with her father, a wealthy landowner who becomes obsessed with eliminating the carp fish from his artificial lagoon. Featuring a new introduction from Jenkins, the film streams on the Channel in a limited engagement.
*Premiering on the Criterion Channel this month.
Tuesday, April 10
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Manhatta and The Naked City
The New York of the past comes to life in these two portraits, shot in different periods in the city's history. A pioneering work of American avant-garde cinema, the silent short Manhatta (1921)- directed by photographer Paul Strand and painter Charles Sheeler-takes in the modern metropolis from a variety of soaring perspectives, assembling a miniature symphony of the city in all its industrial splendor. Shot on location more than a quarter of a century later, Jules Dassin's masterpiece The Naked City (1948), a noir procedural inspired by Italian neorealism, offers a grittier view of Lower Manhattan from street level.
 
Wednesday, April 11
The 400 Blows: Edition #5
 
François Truffaut's first feature is also his most personal. Told from the point of view of Truffaut's cinematic counterpart, Antoine Doinel (Jean-Pierre Léaud), The 400 Blows sensitively re-creates the trials of Truffaut's own childhood, unsentimentally portraying aloof parents, oppressive teachers, and petty crime. The film marked Truffaut's passage from leading critic to trailblazing auteur of the French New Wave. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: two audio commentaries, one by cinema professor Brian Stonehill and the other by director François Truffaut's lifelong friend Robert Lachenay; rare audition footage of Jean-Pierre Léaud, Patrick Auffay, and Richard Kanayan; newsreel footage from the film's showing at Cannes; and more.
 
Friday, April 13
Friday Night Double Feature: M and Peeping Tom
 
These unsettling and widely influential thrillers give viewers a glimpse inside the psychopathic mind. Fritz Lang's expressionist touchstone M (1931) revolves around the Berlin manhunt for a murderer of children (Peter Lorre), in the process offering an analysis of the man's tortured psyche. In Peeping Tom (1960), a controversial film that nearly ended his career but is now regarded as a masterpiece, Michael Powell offers a Freudian portrait of a London serial killer (Carl Boehm), a cameraman with a predilection for recording the terror of his victims.

Monday, April 16
In Search of Ozu
 
In this original documentary, filmmaker Daniel Raim delves into Yasujiro Ozu's remarkable late work, in which the master made the leap from black and white to color. In his stirring tribute to the great filmmaker, Raim examines Ozu's life and work through archival treasures such as his diary and the red teakettle from the family drama Equinox Flower (1958); sits down with Ozu's nephew and the producer of the director's gently elegiac final film, An Autumn Afternoon (1962); and interweaves many scenes and images from the vibrant and humane films with which the director capped his career. Alongside the documentary, we present five of Ozu's color films, including Equinox Flower, Floating Weeds (1959), Late Autumn (1960), The End of Summer (1961), and An Autumn Afternoon (1962). 
 
Tuesday, April 17
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Casus belli* and Weekend
 
Two critiques of consumerism that make dazzling use of tracking shots. In Greek filmmaker Yorgos Zois's sinuous debut short, Casus belli (2010), an apparently continuous dolly shot observes different queues of people, from the supermarket checkout line to the wait at the betting-agency counter-and back again-wryly revealing the social divisions among those standing in place. Jean-Luc Godard's acid comedy Weekend (1967), in which a bourgeois couple set out to secure an inheritance from a dying relative, opens with a famous seven-minute-long shot of a massive traffic pileup, setting the tone for the entropic satire to follow.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Wednesday, April 18
The Hero: Edition #911
 
In this psychologically rich character study, written and directed by Satyajit Ray, Bengali film star Uttam Kumar draws on his real-world celebrity to play Arindam Mukherjee, a matinee idol on the brink of his first flop. When Mukherjee boards an overnight train to Delhi to accept an award, a journalist (Sharmila Tagore) approaches him seeking an exclusive interview, which initiates a conversation that sends the actor reeling down a path of self-examination. Seamlessly integrating rueful flashbacks and surreal dream sequences with the quietly revelatory stories of the train's other passengers, The Hero is a graceful meditation on art, fame, and regret from one of world cinema's most keenly perceptive filmmakers. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: a program featuring an interview from 2008 with actor Sharmila Tagore, and a program featuring film scholar Meheli Sen.
 
Friday, April 20
Friday Night Double Feature: Babette's Feast and The Cook, the Thief, His Wife and Her Lover

Food represents the highest of arts and the basest of cruelties in this cinematic banquet. Gabriel Axel's Oscar-winning Babette's Feast, adapted from a short story by Isak Dinesen, tells the moving story of a French housekeeper with a mysterious past who brings quiet revolution in the form of one exquisite meal to a circle of starkly pious villagers in late-nineteenth-century Denmark. It's paired with an outrageously decadent masterpiece from Peter Greenaway, who stages a modern Jacobean revenge tragedy in a lavish restaurant, where a brutal gangster (Michael Gambon) holds court while his wife (Helen Mirren) sneaks away to her paramour. With vivid cinematography by Sacha Vierny and a hypnotic Michael Nyman score, The Cook, the Thief, His Wife and Her Lover culminates in a memorably gruesome feast.
 
Monday, April 23
Observations on Film Art No. 18: Staging and Performance in Ivan the Terrible, Part II

Sergei Eisenstein's final film, a two-part biopic of the notorious Tsar Ivan IV, is one of the revolutionary director's boldest experiments in film form, frequently departing from the codes of cinematic realism. In this month's episode of Observations on Film Art, a Channel-exclusive series that takes a look at how great filmmakers use cinematic devices and techniques, scholar David Bordwell examines Eisenstein's concept of "expressive movement," and shows how the director uses it to stage elaborate set pieces that incorporate the languages of painting and dance.
 
Tuesday, April 24
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Ghost Trip and Kings of the Road

These spare, existential road movies take in vast landscapes in stunning black and white. Bill Morrison's eerie Ghost Trip, a rare "fiction" film from an artist best known for his use of archival material, follows a mysterious driver on an American odyssey from coast to coast, passing through deserts, casinos, and graveyards along the way. Then, the capstone of Wim Wenders's Road Trilogy accompanies a film projector repairman and a depressed psychologist as they roam aimlessly from one movie theater to another across a melancholy Germany still haunted by war.
 
Wednesday, April 25
An Actor's Revenge: Edition #912

A uniquely prolific and chameleonic figure of world cinema, Kon Ichikawa delivered a burst of stylistic bravado with this intricate tale of betrayal and retribution. Set in the cloistered world of nineteenth-century kabuki theater, the film charts a female impersonator's attempts to avenge the deaths of his parents, who were driven to insanity and suicide by a trio of corrupt men. Ichikawa takes the conventions of melodrama and turns them on their head, bringing the hero's fractured psyche to life in boldly experimental widescreen compositions infused with kaleidoscopic color, pop-art influences, and meticulous choreography. Anchored by a magnificently androgynous performance by Kazuo Hasegawa, reprising a role he had played on-screen three decades earlier, An Actor's Revenge is an eye-popping examination of how the illusions of art intersect with life. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: A rare 1999 Directors Guild of Japan interview with director Kon Ichikawa, conducted by film critic Yuki Mori; and an interview with critic, filmmaker, and festival programmer Tony Rayns.
 
Thursday, April 26
Adventures in Moviegoing with Adam Gopnik

This month's guest curator, author and longtime New Yorker contributor Adam Gopnik, is a writer of omnivorous interests. For his selection of favorite films, he handpicked gems such as Jacques Demy's The Umbrellas of Cherbourg and Jean Cocteau's Orpheus, and then sat down with Antonio Monda, artistic director of the Rome Film Festival, to discuss a lifetime of moviegoing. From watching European cinema on television with his family, to seeing Singin' in the Rain during his adolescence in Paris, to his first date with the woman he would go on to marry (they saw Jean Vigo's achingly romantic L'Atalante), Gopnik chronicles his infatuation with cinema, a medium whose storytelling methods he often seeks to emulate in his own writing.
 
Friday, April 27
Friday Night Double Feature: Tokyo Drifter and The Long Good Friday

This gangster-movie double bill finds two career criminals attempting to go straight, only to get sucked back into the underworld. In Tokyo Drifter (1966),Seijun Suzuki's delirious pop-art riff on the yakuza genre, reformed hit man Tetsu gets called back from retirement to do battle with a rival gang, resulting in an onslaught of giddily stylized action. Then, a magnetic Bob Hoskins stars in John Mackenzie's The Long Good Friday (1980) as a vicious London mob boss whose best-laid plans to cross over into legitimate business get blown to smithereens over the course of one agonizing, bloody day.
 
Complete list of films premiering on the Criterion Channel this month:
 
April 1
In a Lonely Place, Nicholas Ray, 1950
 
April 3
Monkey Love Experiments, Will Anderson and Ainslie Henderson, 2014
 
April 4
Metropolitan, Whit Stillman, 1990
 
April 9
The Summer of Flying Fish, Marcela Said, 2013
 
April 17
Casus belli, Yorgos Zois, 2010
 
ABOUT THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK
 
The Criterion Channel offers the largest streaming collection of Criterion films available, including classic and contemporary films from around the world, interviews and conversations with filmmakers and never-before-seen programming. The channel's weekly calendar features complete Criterion editions, thematic retrospectives, live events, short films, and select contemporary features, along with exclusive original programming that aims to enhance the Criterion experience for the brand's dedicated fans as well as expanding its reach to new audiences. It is presented as part of FilmStruck, a subscription streaming service that is the exclusive home of the Warner Bros. classic film library and the Criterion Collection. FilmStruck was developed by Turner Classic Movies (TCM) and is managed by TCM in partnership with Warner Bros. and the Criterion Collection.

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO JOIN FILMSTRUCK VISIT HERE
For more information on FilmStruck and The Criterion Channel,

  

March 20, 2018

MARCH PROGRAMMING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK!

       
 
MARCH PROGRAMMING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL ON FILMSTRUCK!
 
Includes five films by Apichatpong Weerasethakul, 
Adventures in Moviegoing with Rebecca Miller, and Ronald Bronstein's Frownland!
 
Monday, March 19
Meet the Filmmakers: Apichatpong Weerasethakul

In the latest entry of Meet the Filmmakers, Canadian actor and filmmaker Connor Jessup profiles Apichatpong Weerasethakul, a maverick of Thai cinema who explores the slippery nature of time and consciousness with a sublimely idiosyncratic, often surreal approach to film form. Shot in the Colombian jungle, where Apichatpong was scouting locations last year for his next project, this rare glimpse at the director's creative world delves into the dreams and desires that fuel his work. Along with the documentary, the Criterion Channel presents a sampling of his films, including Mysterious Object at Noon (2000), Tropical Malady (2004), 
Syndromes and a Century (2006), the Cannes award-winningUncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives (2010), and Cemetery of Splendor (2015).
 
Tuesday, March 20
Tuesday's Short + Feature: The Colour of His Hair* and Victim

These stirring indictments of social oppression explore a shameful period in British history when homosexuality was forbidden by law. Based on an unrealized script written in 1964 for the Homosexual Law Reform Society, an organization that campaigned for the decriminalization of sexual relations between men, Sam Ashby's 2017 short The Colour of His Hair offers an impressionistic portrait of a turbulent era through a mix of narrative and documentary techniques. Ashby's film is paired with an essential document from that era, Basil Dearden's 1961 Victim, which stars Dirk Bogarde as a member of a large group of closeted London men who become targets of a blackmailer.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.

Wednesday, March 21
Harlan County USA: Edition #334

Barbara Kopple's Oscar-winning Harlan County USA unflinchingly documents a grueling coal miners' strike in a small Kentucky town. With unprecedented access, Kopple and her crew captured the miners' sometimes violent struggles with strikebreakers, local police, and company thugs. Featuring a haunting soundtrack-with legendary country and bluegrass artists Hazel Dickens, Merle Travis, Sarah Gunning, and Florence Reece-the film is a heartbreaking record of the thirteen-month struggle between a community fighting to survive and a corporation dedicated to the bottom line. SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: an audio commentary by Kopple and editor Nancy Baker; The Making of "Harlan County, USA," a documentary featuring interviews with Kopple, crew members and strike participants featured in the film; a video interview with legendary bluegrass singer-songwriter Hazel Dickens; never-before-seen outtakes from the film; and more.
 
Thursday, March 22
Art-House America: Northwest Film Forum, Seattle, Washington 

All around the country, in big cities and small towns, independent art-house theaters are thriving hubs of moviegoing, each with its own story to tell. With this series, Criterion goes wherever film culture is happening and brings back brief documentary portraits of different local art houses along with a selection of films handpicked by their programmers. The latest episode pays a visit to Seattle's Northwest Film Forum, where an innovative team, led by programmer and executive director Courtney Sheehan, has turned a grassroots movie theater into a vibrant venue for a wide range of visual culture, as well as live events, education initiatives, and political activism. The NWFF demonstrates the exciting possibilities of cinema as a folk art that can engage directly with the community, and its diverse programs have included showcases of Philippine cinema and films by local and indigenous filmmakers. The first entry in an ongoing series that NWFF will be programming on the Channel is Robinson Devor's 2005 Police Beat*, a disarmingly surreal portrait of a West African immigrant who finds work in Seattle as a bicycle cop. Also available on the Channel are the previous episodes in the series, celebrating the Walter Reade Theater, in New York City, and the Gold Town Nickelodeon, in Juneau, Alaska.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
Friday, March 23
Friday Night Double Feature: Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and A Married Couple
 
Marriage becomes an emotional battleground in these tightly focused studies of domestic discord. In 1966, Mike Nichols made his debut as a film director by bringing Edward Albee's Broadway sensation to the screen, with celebrity couple Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton taking on the venomous leading roles. Allan King's "actuality drama" A Married Couple (1969) is a revealing documentary about Billy and Antoinette Edwards, ex-bohemians struggling with the demands of marriage and the changing gender roles of the 1960s. Jaw-droppingly intense in its examination of marital conflict, King's film finds just as much drama in a real couple's daily life as Nichols does in Albee's play.
 
Monday, March 26
Observations on Film Art No. 17: Narrative Motifs in Chungking Express

Wong Kar-wai's Chungking Express(1994) captures the whiplash rhythms and tenuous connections of urban life in a bifurcated story that follows two heartsick Hong Kong cops (Takeshi Kaneshiro and Tony Leung) who cross paths at the Midnight Express take-out restaurant stand, where the ethereal pixie waitress Faye (Faye Wong) works. In this month's episode of Observations on Film Art, a Channel-exclusive series that takes a look at how great filmmakers use cinematic devices and techniques, scholar David Bordwell isolates the recurring motifs that wind throughout the film and shows how Wong uses them to unite the story's seemingly unrelated halves.
  
Monday, March 26
Frownland*
Since its under-the-radar release in 2007, Ronald Bronstein's directorial debut has become a touchstone of contemporary independent cinema, admired by a generation of young filmmakers and winning rapturous praise from influential publications like Cahiers du cinéma for its uncompromising vision. Centering on the cringeworthy misadventures of a neurotic and staggeringly inarticulate coupon salesman (a remarkable Dore Mann), this character study is a bleak but unforgettable New York story-one that anticipates later works by filmmakers such as Josh and Benny Safdie, with whom Bronstein has gone on to collaborate as an actor and writer.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Tuesday, March 27
Tuesday's Short + Feature: Lira's Forest* and Tropical Malady

Animal spirits enact rituals of love and death in this pair of sylvan fables by the director and the subject of this month's new Meet the Filmmakers episode, Connor Jessup and Apichatpong Weerasethakul. Jessup's short Lira's Forest (2017) follows an ailing woman who receives a visit from a mysterious spirit and undergoes an otherworldly transformation. Apichatpong's
Tropical Malady(2004) follows the tender romance that blossoms between two young men in the Thai countryside, then plunges into the jungle where their love story is reconfigured as the tale of a hunter's search for a legendary tiger. Also on the Channel, Jessup, a devoted student of Apichatpong's beguiling approach to cinema, profiles the Thai master in this month's installment of Meet the Filmmakers.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.

Wednesday, March 28
The Passion of Joan of Arc: Edition #62

Spiritual rapture and institutional hypocrisy come to stark, vivid life in one of the most transcendent masterpieces of the silent era. Chronicling the trial of Joan of Arc in the hours leading up to her execution, Danish master Carl Theodor Dreyer depicts her torment with startling immediacy, employing an array of techniques-expressionistic lighting, interconnected sets, painfully intimate close-ups-to immerse viewers in her subjective experience. Anchoring Dreyer's audacious formal experimentation is a legendary performance by Renée Falconetti, whose haunted face channels both the agony and the ecstasy of martyrdom.
SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: three scores: Richard Einhorn's Voices of Light, one by Goldfrapp's Will Gregory and Portishead's Adrian Utley, and one by composer and pianist Mie Yanashita; an audio commentary from 1999 by film scholar Casper Tybjerg; an interview from 1995 with actor Renée Falconetti's daughter and biographer, Hélène Falconetti; and more.

Thursday, March 29
Adventures in Moviegoing with Rebecca Miller
 
Filmmaker, visual artist, actor, and novelist Rebecca Miller sat down with us to share a personal history of moviegoing that stretches back to childhood. Miller's parents, playwright Arthur Miller and photographer Inge Morath, initiated her into art-house cinema at an early age, fostering the eclectic taste that would go on to inform her creative life. Miller is fascinated with movies that stay anchored in emotional realism while violating the codes of naturalism. Here she explains how her work in various art forms has influenced her filmmaking, and selects a series of favorites that speak to her abiding interest in evoking psychic states on-screen, including John Cassavetes's Opening Night, Agnès Varda's Vagabond, and Jane Campion's Sweetie.
 
Thursday, March 29
By Rebecca Miller

The subject of this month's Adventures in Moviegoing, writer-director Rebecca Miller transitioned from visual art to filmmaking with her 1995 directorial debut, Angela*, a haunting tale of a young girl who retreats into her fantasies to cope with her emotionally volatile mother. Miller's vivid evocations of complex psychological states are a hallmark of her subsequent features, including the 2005 drama The Ballad of Jack and Rose*, a devastating look at the twilight of the 1960s counterculture in which Daniel Day-Lewis plays a Scottish farmer whose discovery of new love throws his intensely close relationship with his teenage daughter into chaos.
*Premiering on the Channel this month.
 
Friday, March 30
Friday Night Double Feature: The Phantom of Liberty and Tampopo

When Juzo Itami set out to make a movie about human appetite and culinary culture, he couldn't figure out how to string together the episodes he had imagined, until he remembered The Phantom of Liberty, which struck him as "the kind of film where the last thing of the scene before leads to the next event-that kind of quick-change thing." Luis Buñuel's penultimate film is an audacious satire of bourgeois norms, from the hypocrisy of conventional morality to the arbitrariness of social arrangements, as told through a series of non sequiturs. Inspired by Buñuel's "quick-change" structure, Itami interspersed the story of Tampopo's eponymous heroine with the erotic exploits of a gastronome gangster and a string of standalone skits, spicing the broth of his "ramen western" with comic flavor.
 
Complete list of films premiering on the Criterion Channel this month:

March 6
Art, Adrian Sitaru, 2014
 
March 13
Home, Daniel Mulloy, 2016
 
March 14
Science Is Fiction: 23 Films by Jean Painlevé
 
March 19
Frownland, Ronald Bronstein, 2007
 
March 20
The Colour of His Hair, Sam Ashby, 2017
 
March 22
Police Beat, Robinson Devor, 2005
 
March 27
Lira's Forest, Connor Jessup, 2017
 
March 29
Angela, Rebecca Miller, 1995
The Ballad of Jack and Rose, Rebecca Miller, 2005
FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO JOIN FILMSTRUCK VISIT HERE

ABOUT THE CRITERION CHANNEL
 
The Criterion Channel offers the largest streaming collection of Criterion films available, including classic and contemporary films from around the world, interviews and conversations with filmmakers and never-before-seen programming. The channel's weekly calendar features complete Criterion editions, thematic retrospectives, live events, short films, and select contemporary features, along with exclusive original programming that aims to enhance the Criterion experience for the brand's dedicated fans as well as expanding its reach to new audiences. 

ABOUT FILMSTRUCK

FilmStruck is a subscription on-demand service that offers film aficionados a comprehensive and constantly refreshed library of films including an eclectic mix of contemporary arthouse, indie, foreign, cult and classic Hollywood films. FilmStruck is the exclusive streaming home to the Warner Bros. classic film library and the Criterion Collection. FilmStruck was developed by Turner Classic Movies (TCM) and is managed by TCM in partnership with Warner Bros. and the Criterion Collection.
ABOUT THE CRITERION COLLECTION

Since 1984, the Criterion Collection has been dedicated to publishing important classic and contemporary films from around the world in editions that offer the highest technical quality and award-winning, original supplements. No matter the medium-from laserdisc to DVD and Blu-ray to FilmStruck, the streaming service developed in collaboration with Turner Classic Movies - Criterion has maintained its pioneering commitment to presenting each film as its maker would want it seen, in state-of-the-art restorations with special features designed to encourage repeated watching and deepen the viewer's appreciation of the art of film.

Metal Monday - Khemmis x Decibel Magazine

Check out Adam Zuniga, LA GRANDE BOUFFE (THE BIG FEAST) podcast co-host from our CARNAL KNOWLEDGE episode, with his new Metal Craft Beer video series. Can't say it doesn't rock!

February 22, 2018

Iconic French Speaker Luncheons with Olivier Barrot

French Institute Alliance Française (FIAF)

introduces

Iconic French Speaker Luncheons

with Olivier Barrot

FRENCH SPEAKER LUNCHEONS

Tuesday, February 27  Jacques AttaliAn Unusual Destiny

Tuesday, March 27  Frédéric BeigbederLiterary Icon

Tuesday, April 24  Christophe Barbier: The Theater of Politics

FIAF · Le Skyroom; 22 East 60th Street

New York, NYFebruary 22, 2018The French Institute Alliance Française (FIAF), New York’s premiere French cultural center, is thrilled to launch Iconic French Speaker Luncheons, an incisive new series of conversations hosted by French journalist and TV personality Olivier Barrot. Over an elegant luncheon, Mr. Barrot will bring his unique insights into today’s most pressing issues as he interviews some of France’s greatest minds about their areas of expertise.

This season’s guests include economist, social theorist, writer, and political advisor Jacques Attali on Tuesday, February 27; author, literary critic, and TV presenter Frédéric Beigbeder on Tuesday, March 27; and journalist Christophe Barbier on Tuesday, April 24. All three events will take place at 12:30pm in FIAF’s Le Skyroom.

All talks will be in English.

About Olivier Barrot

Journalist, author, and television personality Olivier Barrot is a prominent voice in French cultural life. He hosts the daily literary TV program Un livre un jour on France 3 and TV 5 and teaches at Ecole polytechnique de Zurich. He also directs a series of public discussions about theater and acting with actors of the Comédie Française. He is the host of French Literature in the Making at New York University, a series of evenings with French writers speaking about their work.

This season, the Iconic French Speaker Luncheons series features:

Jacques Attali: An Unusual Destiny

Tuesday, February 27 at 12:30pm

Jacques Attali—the widely influential French economist, social theorist, writer, political advisor—will discuss his unusual life and work. Considered one of the top 100 public intellectuals in the world (Foreign Policy Magazine), Attali has led a multi-faceted life and has found success at every turn.

Jacques Attali was Special Adviser to President François Mitterrand from 1981 to 1991. He helped to found and was the first President of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development in London from 1991 to 1993. He was designated President of the Commission for the Liberation for French Economic Growth by President Nicolas Sarkozy in August 2007.

An unparalleled thinker, Attali has written over seventy books including texts on mathematics, economics, and sociology as well as plays, biographies, memoirs, children’s books, and novels.

Attali is also a university professor, investment banker, Honorary Member of the Council of State, CEO of the Paris-based international strategy consulting firm A&A, and President of the international non-profit microfinancing organization Positive Planet.

Frédéric Beigbeder: Literary Icon

Tuesday, March 27 at 12:30pm

French novelist, critic, TV personality, DJ, fashion model, and film director Frédéric Beigbeder is a true literary celebrity. Known for his wild side and his self-deprecating public persona, he is also a serious talent. Over lunch, Beigbeder will discuss his storied career, his approach to writing, and French literature.

An enfant terrible with a flair for provocation, Frédéric Beigbeder is known as much for his feverish coverage in celebrity magazines as for his distinguished career as an author and intellectual.

Born into a privileged family in Neuilly-sur-Seine, Beigbeder published his first novel, Mémoires d’un jeune homme dérangé, at the young age of 24. He subsequently worked as an advertising copywriter for various agencies including Young & Rubicam, an experience that would inspire his bestselling novel, 99 francs.

Alongside his advertising career, Beigbeder worked as a writer and literary columnist for French magazines including ElleParis MatchVoici, and GQ. He was an editor for Flammarion from 2003 to 2006, and co-founded two literary magazines, NRV (a pun on the word énérvé, meaning annoyed) and Bordel. Since 2013, he has been the executive editor of Lui, the legendary French men’s entertainment magazine.

Beigbeder created the Prix de Flore, which has been awarded to authors including Michel Houellebecq, Amélie Nothomb, and Christine Angot, and co-founded the Prix Sade. In 2005 he won the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize for his novel Windows on the World, and in 2009 he received the Prix Renaudot for Un roman français. Several of his novels have been adapted for the screen.

Christophe Barbier: The Theater of Politics

Tuesday, April 24 at 12:30pm

French journalist Christophe Barbier has been a major voice in French politics for over 30 years. An editor at L’Express from 1996–2016, the author of a dozen books, and recently, a stage actor, Barbier will share his unique perspective on theater and politics.

From composing a rap about President Emmanuel Macron to performing a headstand on a national television news program, Christophe Barbier is no stranger to the theater of politics.

He began his career as a political reporter at Le Point and on Europe 1 before becoming top political editor at the newsweekly L’Express in 1996. He was named editorial director in 2006, a position he held until 2016, and remains a member of the editorial team today.

Barbier hosted the morning news program on the Canal+ digital news channel I-Télé since 2011, before joining BFM-TV, France most-watched television news network, in 2016. He also makes frequent appearances as a political commentator on a variety of French television news programs.

Barbier has written over a dozen books on politics, including Les Derniers Jours de François MitterrandLa Comédie des Orphelins, and La Guerre de l’Elysée n’aura pas lieu.

Beyond his journalistic career, Barbier has directed over 60 plays and recently performed the one-man-show Le Tour du Théâtre en 80 minutes at the Théâtre de Poche Montparnasse. Barbier is the director of the Théâtre de l’Archicube, the theater company of his alma mater, the prestigious École Normale Supérieure.

About FIAF

The French Institute Alliance Française (FIAF) is New York’s premiere French cultural and language center. FIAF's mission is to create and offer New Yorkers innovative and unique programs in education and the arts that explore the evolving diversity and richness of French cultures. FIAF seeks to generate new ideas and promote cross cultural dialogue through partnerships and new platforms of expression. www.fiaf.org

Merci!

What:

Iconic French Speaker Luncheons

When:

·         Jacques Attali: An Unusual Destiny: Tuesday, February 27 at 12:30pm

·         Frédéric Beigbeder: Literary Icon: Tuesday, March 27 at 12:30pm

·         Christophe Barbier: The Theater of Politics: Tuesday, April 24 at 12:30pm

Where:

FIAF, Le Skyroom, 22 East 60th Street (between Park & Madison Avenue)

Admission:

FIAF Members $40; Non-Members $50

Tickets:

800 982 2787 | fiaf.org

Information:

212 355 6160 | fiaf.org  

Transportation:

4, 5, 6, N, R and Q to 59th Street & Lexington Avenue

 

 

F to 63rd Street & Lexington Avenue; E to 53rd Street & 5th Avenue

Twitter: @FIAFNY

Instagram: @FIAFNY

Facebook: Like facebook.com/fiafny

February 10, 2018

Good weather on Mon. Tues. Wed. to see NYC on Cole's "5th & Park" Walking Tour

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Monday 2/13, Tuesday 2/14, and Wednesday 2/5 promise ideal weather for my film and fiction walking tour of beautiful Carnegie Hill! A visit inside Central Park is on the list. 

There is much great culture to savor in Carnegie Hill, one of the country's oldest, and most architecturally rich neighborhoods. The tour combines Central Park, Museum Mile, lush mansions, celebrity homes, and countless filming locations — not to mention the chance of seeing a celebrity on the tour! Stranger things have happened on the rewarding streets of Carnegie Hill. 

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January 31, 2018

THE WORLD BEFORE YOUR FEET

 
Hey friends and colleagues (and all the fans and supporters of Magical Universe),
we're pleased to introduce you to our newest documentary film:

THE WORLD BEFORE YOUR FEET

World Premiere • SXSW Documentary Competition (March 2018)

For over 6 years, Matt Green, 37, has been walking every street in New York City – a total of more than 8000 miles. The World Before Your Feet tells the story of one man’s unusual quest and the journey of discovery, humanity, and wonder that ensues. 
 

From Filmmaker Jeremy Workman (Magical Universe)
From Executive Producers Jesse Eisenberg & Allen Altman

 
In the weeks ahead, we'll follow up with more information and more details on the SXSW World Premiere in March and other subsequent screenings. For now, we appreciate just having you on board as new friends and followers. We're really stoked to share this interesting and unique film with you all soon.

Please Follow us on FACEBOOK
or Follow us on TWITTER
 
THE WORLD BEFORE YOUR FEET
A film by Jeremy Workman featuring Matt Green

Top photo by Michael Berman

Copyright © 2018 Wheelhouse Creative, All rights reserved.

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January 24, 2018

INGMAR BERGMAN'S CINEMA — IN HONOR OF HIS 100th BIRTHDAY

INGMAR BERGMAN'S CINEMA IN HONOR OF HIS 100th BIRTHDAY
A comprehensive retrospective including new restorations of over 30 films spanning four decades of filmmaking — opens at New York's Film Forum Feb 7.

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